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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 68 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 30 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 13 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 9 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Station West (Tennessee, United States) or search for Station West (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Doc. 13.-fight at Campbell's Station, Tenn. Knoxville, Tenn., November 7, 1863. The first engagement of any consequence between our forces and those of Longstreet, in the retreat to Knoxville, took place yesterday, at Campbell's Station — a little collection of houses on the Kingston road, where it forms a junction with the road to Loudon. During the night of Sunday, the rebels mada series of heavy skirmishes ensued along the whole line of the retreat. As we approached Campbell's Station, where it was feared the enemy would endeavor to throw a force upon our flank, from the diy cleared of timber. The ground chosen was, in fact, a succession of farms, commencing at Campbell's Station, and flanking either side of the road for a distance of over two miles. Our guns were iach regiment and brigade came into line of battle. Indeed, the evolutions on the field at Campbell's Station have seldom been excelled in beauty and skill. In coming into position, as well as in the
nusual facilities. Monday, November 16, P. M..--Rumors reached us last evening that a battle was being fought at Campbell's Station, twelve miles from Knoxville, on the Lenoir road. Longstreet's army, variously estimated to number from ten thousacontributed. In every fight in which they have been engaged, and recently in those near Knoxville, at London, at Campbell's Station, and, finally, around the defences on both sides of the river, while on the march, and in cold and in hunger, they on the part of the men to keep the section in motion. Beyond this, nothing occurred worthy of notice till reaching Campbell's Station, when I was ordered by General Burnside, in person, to take up position under cover, and support a section of Benja in memory of Lieutenant-Colonel Huntington Smith, Twentieth Michigan volunteer infantry, who fell at the battle of Campbell's Station. Battery Clifton Lee--East of Fort Huntington Smith, in memory of Captain Clifton Lee, One Hundred and Twelfth I