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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 224 40 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 104 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 90 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 76 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 56 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 52 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 45 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 37 15 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 31 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Stone River (Tennessee, United States) or search for Stone River (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
commands, and whether supporting Hardee's crushing blow upon the enemy's right, or holding the pivot of the position, or rushing madly in that deadly charge, when Breckinridge, in grand array and stern devotion, dashed for those heights across Stone river, the Washington Artillery won on that field the highest praise that soldiers could expect; and Anthony and Reid are left to mark its passage. Vicksburg is sore beset, and Johnston calls and Breckinridge is going, and the Fifth Company asks te: And their life-blood went to color the tide. The fern on the hill-sides was splashed with blood, And down in the corn where poppies grew, Were redder stains than the poppies knew; And crimson-dyed was the rivers' flood. Murfreesboro and Stone river followed in quick succession. In Virginia the four companies participated at Chancellorsville, and at Gettysburg, Pa., were honored by being chosen to fire the two signal guns that opened the great battle of July 3. In the West came Jack
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
us to Kingston's snow-clad fields. We meet the first blasts of a winter campaign. Our tents are finally pitched in winter quarters on Harpeth's frozen banks, where Rosecrans so rudely disturbed us at Christmas eve. Murfreesboro follows and Vaught commands, and whether supporting Hardee's crushing blow upon the enemy's right, or holding the pivot of the position, or rushing madly in that deadly charge, when Breckinridge, in grand array and stern devotion, dashed for those heights across Stone river, the Washington Artillery won on that field the highest praise that soldiers could expect; and Anthony and Reid are left to mark its passage. Vicksburg is sore beset, and Johnston calls and Breckinridge is going, and the Fifth Company asks to follow. Mobile, in passing, gives us new recruits, as rushing through we hurry on to Jackson. But Vicksburg falls 'ere we can cross the Big Black, and Sherman tries to intercept, but strikes us only in our works at Jackson. Four stands of colors
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
redericksburg, Va., the battalions held the post of honor on Marye's Hill against repeated attacks of the Federal troops For the foe had crossed from the other side That day, in the face of a murderous fire That swept them down in its terrible ire: And their life-blood went to color the tide. The fern on the hill-sides was splashed with blood, And down in the corn where poppies grew, Were redder stains than the poppies knew; And crimson-dyed was the rivers' flood. Murfreesboro and Stone river followed in quick succession. In Virginia the four companies participated at Chancellorsville, and at Gettysburg, Pa., were honored by being chosen to fire the two signal guns that opened the great battle of July 3. In the West came Jackson, Miss., Chickamauga, and Missionary Ridge. In Virginia the battalion was doing brave work. The Russian Field Marshal Suwarrow once sent word to the Austrian Archduke Charles, I know nothing of defensive warfare; I only know how to attack.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 72 (search)
rom spies, he broke up camps on the morning of the 25th of December, and pouring down his hordes by way of the Wilson, Nolinsville, Murfreesboroa, and Jefferson turnpikes, drove our outposts back to the main line, established near and crossing Stone river, a short distance in front of the railroad bridge, with its right resting on Lebanon pike. It will be remembered that General Joseph E. Johnston had been placed in command of this Confederate department, but did not engage in active field ope statu quo until the evening of the 2d of January, 1863, when Breckinridge was ordered to attack the enemy's left, in anticipation of the intention of Rosecrans to turn and attack us in rear. Breckinridge burst in mass upon the enemy, crossed Stone river, fording that stream for the purpose, and soon one of the most bitter conflicts of the war ensued. Both sides massed their artillery and used it with terrible effect. But it was soon seen that the enemy's position was too strong, and that Br