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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 82 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 42 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 30 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 8 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Lake Superior (New York, United States) or search for Lake Superior (New York, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 41 results in 30 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agassiz, Louis John Rudolph, 1807-1873 (search)
ived in Boston in 1846, and lectured there Louis Agassiz. on the Animal Kingdom and on Glaciers. In the summer of 1847 the superintendent of the Coast Survey tendered him the facilities of that service for a continuance of his scientific investigations. Professor Agassiz settled in Cambridge, and was made Professor of Zoology and Geology of the Lawrence Scientific School at its foundation in 1848. That year he made. with some of his pupils, a scientific exploration of the shores of Lake Superior. He afterwards explored the southern coasts of the United States, of Brazil, and the waters of the Pacific Ocean. An account of his explorations on the Brazilian coast was given in A journey to Brazil, by Mrs. Agassiz, in 1867. He received the Copley Medal from the Royal Society of London; from the Aeademy of Sciences of Paris, the Monthyon Prize and the Cuvier Prize; the Wollaston Medal from the Geological Society of London; and the Medal of Merit from the King of Prussia. He was a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Algonquian, or Algonkian, Indians, (search)
, Cherokees, Mobilians, and Natchez; and on the east by Nova Scotia. West of the Missipssippi, the Blackfeet and Cheyennes are regarded as a family of the Algonkians. The original land of the Ottawas was on the west side of Lake Huron; but they were seated upon the Ottawa River, in Canada, when the French discovered them, and claimed sovereignty over that region. The Chippewas and Pottawattomies were colsely allied by language and friendship. The former were on the southern shores of Lake Superior; the latter occupied the islands and mainland on the western shores of Green Bay when first discovered by the French. In 1701 they seated themselves on the southern shores of Lake Michigan. The Sacs and Foxes are really one tribe. They were found by the French, in 1680, at the southern extremity of Green Bay. The Menomonees are among the few Indian tribes who occupy the same domain as when they were discovered by Europeans in 1699. That domain is upon the shores of Green Bay, and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Attiwandaronk Indians, (search)
Attiwandaronk Indians, Members of the family of the Hurons and Iroquois, named by the French the Neutral Nation. In early times they inhabited both banks of the Niagara River, but were mostly in Canada. They were first visited in 1627 by the Recollet Father Daillon, and by Brebeuf and Chaumonot in 1642. The Iroquois attacked them in 1651-53, when a part of them submitted and joined the Senecas. and the remainder fled westward and joined the remnant of the fallen Hurons on the borders of Lake Superior.
movement after the declaration of war in 1812 was an attempt to conquer Canada by an invasion of its western border on the Detroit River. It then consisted of two provinces —Lower Canada, with a population of 300,000, mostly of French origin, and Upper Canada, with a population of 100,000, composed largely of American loyalists and their descendants. The regular military force in both provinces did not exceed 2,000 men, scattered over a space of 1,200 miles from Quebec to the foot of Lake Superior. Sir George Prevost was then governor-general, with his residence at Montreal. To enter the province from the States, a water-barrier had to be crossed, while the American frontier was destitute of roads, infected with summer fevers, and sparsely settled. William Hull, a soldier of the Revolution, then governor of Michigan Territory, was consulted about an invasion of Canada, while on a visit at Washington. He insisted that before such an enterprise should be undertaken a naval contro
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Canals. (search)
Ga., to Ogeechee River, Ga. Ohio 4,695,2041835317Cleveland, O., to Portsmouth, O. Oswego5,239,526182838Oswego, N. Y., to Syracuse, N. Y. Pennsylvania7,731,7501839193Columbia, Northumberland, W1ilkesbarre, Huntingdon, Pa. Portage Lake and Lake Superior528,892187325From Keweenaw Bay to Lake Superior. Port Arthur18997Port Arthur, Tex., to Gulf of Mexico. Santa Fe 70,00188010Waldo, Fla., to Melrose, Fla. Sault Ste. Marie 4,000,00018953Connects Lakes Superior and Huron at St. Mary's River. Lake Superior. Port Arthur18997Port Arthur, Tex., to Gulf of Mexico. Santa Fe 70,00188010Waldo, Fla., to Melrose, Fla. Sault Ste. Marie 4,000,00018953Connects Lakes Superior and Huron at St. Mary's River. Schuylkill Navigation Co12,461,6001826108Mill Creek, Pa., to Philadelphia, Pa. Sturgeon Bay and Lake Michigan99,66118811 1-4Between Green Bay and Lake Michigan. St. Mary's Falls7,909,66718961 1-3Connects Lakes Superior and Huron at Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. Susquehanna and Tidewater4,931,345184045Columbia, Pa., to Havre de Grace, Md. Walhonding607,269184325Rochester, O., to Roscoe, O. Welland 23,796,353....26 3-4Connects Lake Ontario and Lake Erie. Chicago drainage Canal A canal inte
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carver, Jonathan 1732-1780 (search)
Carver, Jonathan 1732-1780 Traveller; born in Stillwater, Conn., in 1732; served in the French and Indian War, and afterwards attempted to explore the vast region in America which the English had acquired from the French. He penetrated the country to Lake Superior and its shores and tributaries, and, after travelling about 7.000 miles, he returned to Boston, whence he departed in 1766, and sailed for England, to communicate his discoveries to the government, and to petition the King for a reimbursement of his expenses. His Travels were published in 1778. He was badly used in England, and, by utter neglect, was reduced to a state of extreme destitution. He died in London, Jan. 31, 1780.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chippewa Indians, (search)
eaty at Greenville in 1795. In 1816 they took part in the pacification of the Northwestern tribes, and in 1817 they gave up all their lands in Ohio. At that time they occupied a vast and undefined territory from Mackinaw along the line of Lake Superior to the Mississippi River. The limits of this territory were defined by a treaty in 1825, lands to the United States for equivalent annuities. All but a few bands had gone west of the Mississippi in 1851; and in 1866 the scattered bands in Canada, Michigan, on the borders of Lake Superior, and beyond the Mississippi numbered more than 15,000. Their religion is simply a belief in a good and evil spirit, and the deification of the powers of nature. Various denominations have missionaries among the Chippewas. In 1899 there were 3,410 Chippewas at Devil's Lake agency, North Dakota; 4,682 at La Pointe agency, Wisconsin; 7,833 at White Earth agency, Minnesota; and 6,630 Chippewas and Ottawas combined at the Mackinac agency, Michi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Copper. (search)
h ore, when, for about sixty years, the mine was a State prison. The Lake Superior copper-mines (the most considerable in the world) were first worked, in modern times, in 1845, when traces of ancient mining were found near the Ontonagon River. The Jesuit missionaries had noticed copper ore in that region as early as the middle of the seventeenth century. In making excavations in 1848, a mass of copper, supported upon blocks of wood, with charred wood under it, was found 20 feet below the surface. When taken out it weighed 8 tons. The output of copper in the United States during the calendar year 1899 amounted to 585,342,124 pounds, valued at $104,190,898. In that and the following year the output at the famous Calumet and Hecla and other mines in the Lake Superior region, and at the mines at Butte, Mont., was largely increased, and there was a remarkable development of copper-mining in many parts of the country where the metal had not been supposed to exist in paying quantities.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dablon, Claude, 1618-1697 (search)
Dablon, Claude, 1618-1697 Jesuit missionary; born in Dieppe, France, in 1618; began a mission to the Onondaga Indians in New York in 1655, and six years afterwards he accompanied Druillettes in an overland journey to the Hudson Bay region. In 1668 he went with Marquette to Lake Superior, and in 1670 was appointed superior of the missions of the Upper Lakes. He prepared the Relations concerning New France for 1671-72, and also a narrative of Marquette's journey, published in John Gilmary Shea's Discovery and exploration of the Mississippi Valley (1853). He died in Quebec, Canada, Sept. 20; 1697.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garfield, James Abram 1831-1881 (search)
ief that the adventurers were about to find China. In 1609 Champlain pushed above the rapids and discovered the beautiful lake that bears his name. In 1615 Priest La Caron pushed northward and westward through the wilderness and discovered Lake Huron. In 1635 the Jesuit missionaries founded the Mission St. Mary. In 1654 another priest had entered the wilderness of northern New York and found the salt springs of Onondaga. In 1659-60 French traders and priests passed the winter on Lake Superior and established missions along its shores. Among the earlier discoverers, no name shines out with more brilliancy than that of the Chevalier La Salle. The story of his explorations can scarcely be equalled in romantic interest by any of the stirring tales of the Crusaders. Born of a proud and wealthy family in the north of France, he was destined for the service of the church and of the Jesuit order. But his restless spirit, fired with the love of adventure, broke away from the ecc
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