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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 2 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Tippah River (Mississippi, United States) or search for Tippah River (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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sition with artillery. We passed through Waterford, and camped three miles south-east of the railroad. We destroyed a considerable portion of the telegraph line. Very little skirmishing. Thirteenth, marched at daylight; built a bridge at Tippah Creek; crossed at four P. M., and camped for the night ten miles south; considerable skirmishing. Fourteenth, marched at daylight; crossed the Tallahatchie at New-Albany at noon, and camped four miles south of that place; raining. Fifteenth, mccessfully done. The Second and Third brigades then moved on the Holly Spring road, and the First brigade, with the entire train and the negroes, marched on the Beck Spring road. On the twenty-fourth February the entire force had crossed the Tippah River. McCrellis's and Hepburn's brigades marched to Germantown, on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, fourteen miles from Memphis, and Waring's brigade crossed the Wolf River near Colliersville, and moved slowly toward Memphis, where it arrived