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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Twisty Bayou (Louisiana, United States) or search for Twisty Bayou (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
Chapter 30: Naval and military expedition to Yazoo City. capture of the enemy's works. the Baron deKalb blown up by torpedoes. expedition up the Red, Black and Tensas Rivers, under Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge. destruction of enemy's vessels and stores. the marine brigade, its important services. operations of Lieutenant-Commander Le Roy Fitch on the Tennessee River. attack on colored troops at Milliken's bend. attack on Helena, Arkansas, by General Price. defeat of the the evacuation of Haines' Bluff, and the last attempt of the Confederates to carry on naval operations in that quarter abandoned. At the same time that the expedition was sent up the Yazoo another was dispatched up the Red River, ascending the Black and Tensas Rivers. Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge penetrated to the head of navigation on the latter stream, at Tensas Lake and Bayou Macon, thirty miles above Vicksburg, and within five or six miles of the Mississippi River. Parties of the en
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
d, were at an end. The disposition of the enemy's forces at that time, according to the best information that could be obtained, was as follows: Magruder had about 20,000 men of all arms, of which 15,000 were serviceable. The main body covered Galveston and Houston from an anticipated movement from Matagorda peninsula, still held by our troops; Walker's division, numbering 7,000 men, were upon the Atchafalaya and Red Rivers, from Opelousas to Fort De Russy; Mouton's division, between the Black and Washita rivers, from Red River to Monroe, numbering 6,000; while Price, with two heavy divisions of infantry, estimated at 5,000, and a large cavalry force, estimated at from 7,000 to 10,000, held the country from Monroe to Camden and Arkadelphia, confronting Steele. Magruder could spare 10,000 of his force to resist an attack from the east, leaving his fortifications well garrisoned on the coast, while Price could furnish at least an additional 5,000 from the north, making a formidable
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
encing batteries at Liverpool. gun-boats damaged. pushing up the Yazoo. the expedition falls back. dashing attack on Waterloo. the Forest Rose drives Confederates out of Waterproof. important services rendered by tin-clads. expedition up Black and Washita Rivers. gun-boats drive Confederates out of Trinity and Harrisonburg. heroic seamen. Plot to blow up fleet. Confederate secret service. letters of Confederate Secretary of the Navy and others. names of persons in Confederate secble servant, J. M. Anderson, Captain Commanding Post. H. C. Lunt, Lieutenant and Adjutant. Captain Johnston, Commanding Gun-boat No. 9. In the latter part of February, Admiral Porter fitted out an expedition to go, via the Red River, up the Black and Washita Rivers, under the command of Lieutenant-Commander F. M. Ramsey, for the purpose of breaking up the Confederate posts that were being formed along these rivers and destroying their provisions. The expedition consisted of the following
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 55: operations of the Mississippi Squadron in the latter part of 1864 and in 1865. (search)
rapidly to a close. The retreat of Hood left the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers comparatively free from Confederates, and there was little prospect of another invasion of the State while General Thomas remained in command. The vessels of the Mississippi Squadron were scattered along the great river, where the guerillas still carried on their operations on a small scale. Very little occurred that could embellish the pages of history. The Red River region was revisited, the Washita and Black Rivers patrolled, and every precaution taken to guard those inland waters. At this time the Confederate ram Webb succeeded in making her way past all the vessels of the fleet and reached a point twenty-five miles below New Orleans, where she was destroyed, as we have heretofore mentioned. This episode created quite an excitement in the fleet for the time, but it appears that no one was to blame for the Webb getting so far down the river unharmed. The dash of the Webb was the last affair of