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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 8: capture of Fernandina and the coast South of Georgia. (search)
Chapter 8: capture of Fernandina and the coast South of Georgia. Reconnoitering along the coast. Confederates evacuate their defences on Tybee and Warsaw Islands. a General stampede. the effect of Dupont's victory. lost opportunities. sea Islands. Congregation of slaves at Hilton Head. entrenchments erected at Hilton Head. General Stevens. Beaufort occupied. reconnoissance up the Tybee River to Fort Pulaski. expedition to Fernandina. commanders of and vessels composinga Sound and found on the point of Otter island some heavy fortifications; but the magazine had been blown up and the armament removed. At the same time Commander C. R. P. Rodgers made a reconnoissance of Warsaw Sound, and found the fort on Warsaw Island dismantled and the magazine destroyed. An examination of Wilmington River showed heavy works still occupied by the enemy. On the Ogeechee and Vernon rivers heavy earth-works were being erected by the Confederates. Commander Drayton cross
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
uilt in the South. The Weehawken, Captain John Rodgers, and the Nahant, Commander John Downes, were employed blockading the Atlanta at the mouth of Wilmington River. Early in the morning of June 17th, 1863, Confederate iron-clad Atlanta, captured in Warsaw Sound. it was reported to Captain Rodgers that a Confederate iron-clad was coming down the river. The Weehawken was immediately cleared for action, the cable slipped, and the Monitor steamed slowly towards the northeast end of Warsaw Island, then turned and stood up the Sound, heading for the enemy, who came on with confidence, as if sure of victory. Two steamers followed the Confederate iron-clad, filled with people who had come down to see the Union vessels captured or driven away. The Nahant, having no pilot, followed in the wake of the Weehawken. When the Atlanta was about a mile and a half from the Weehawken she fired a rifled shot which passed across the stern of the later vessel and struck near the Nahant. At t