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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 18 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 16 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 10 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee. You can also browse the collection for Waterloo, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Waterloo, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 1: ancestry. (search)
f genius, of which, forty-four years afterward, his great son was an illustrious example. On June 18, 1817, from Nassau, he writes: This is the day of the month when your dear mother became my wife, and it is not so hot in this tropical region as it was then at Shirley. Since that happy day, marked only by the union of two humble lovers, it has become conspicuous as the day our war with Great Britain was declared in Washington, and the one that sealed the doom of Bonaparte on the field of Waterloo. The British general, rising gradatim from his first blow struck in Portugal, climbed on that day to the summit of fame, and became distinguished by the first of titles, Deliverer of the Civilized World. Alexander, Hannibal, and Caesar, among the ancients; Marlborough, Eugene, Turenne, and Frederick, among the moderns, opened their arms to receive him as a brother in glory. Again he tells him that Thales, Pittacus, and others in Greece taught the doctrine of morality almost in our ver
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 7: Atlantic coast defenses.-assigned to duty in Richmond as commander in chief under the direction of the Southern President. (search)
when the swords are drawn the scabbards should be thrown away ; and he would have fought under the black flag with as pleasant a smile as his countenance could assume. Earnestly and conscientiously believing the South was right, in the spring of 1861 he was strongly inclined to war. In some respects he resembled Blucher; like him he was bold, bluff, and energetic, and, as with Blucher, his loyalty to the cause he adopted was a passion. The grim old soldier whom Wellington welcomed at Waterloo smoked, swore, and drank at seventy, and just there the resemblance ceased. Above others, on either side, Jackson understood the great value of celerity in military movements, and his infantry was termed foot cavalry. To be under heavy fire, he said, filled him with a delicious excitement. His death afterward, at Chancellorsville, lost the South Gettysburg; for General Lee has said, Had I Stonewall Jackson at Gettysburg I would have won a great victory. He was a blazing meteor of batt
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 10: Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg. (search)
al! Let Jubal straighten that fence! and it was securely rebuilt. The Union troops were broken and driven back with great slaughter. Meade lost in killed, wounded, and missing, 1,853, and Gibbon 1,266 men, in a short, fierce, furious and useless combat. Meade told Franklin he found it quite hot, taking off his slouch hat and showing two bullet holes between which and the top of his head there must have been little space. To Lee-calm, self-contained and self-reliant as Wellington at Waterloo — from his position on Telegraph (since called Lee's) Hill, the movement appeared like an armed reconnoissance, and was only considered a precursor to something more serious. Jackson was much pleased at the result on his front. He appeared that day for the first and last time in a bright new uniform which replaced his former dingy suit, having actually exchanged his faded old cap for another which was resplendent in gold lace, a present from J. E. B. Stuart. It was a most remarkable meta
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 13: campaign in Virginia.-Bristol Station.-mine Run.-Wilderness. (search)
hopelessness of another attack upon Lee's lines; they had been there, and did not propose to make another useless, bloody experiment. In an incredibly short time twelve thousand seven hundred and thirty-seven of their number had dropped from their ranks. Who knew how many would fail to answer roll call after another attack? Cold Harbor, said General Grant after the war, is the only battle I ever fought that I would not fight over again under the circumstances. Wellington, victorious at Waterloo, said to Lord Fitzroy: I have never fought such a battle, and I trust I shall never fight such another. Lee proudly stood at the gate of his capital. If Grant was going to fight it out on that line, he must enter there. Another flank move would carry him farther from his objective, so he determined to lay siege to Lee's position and dig up to it, and began the construction of parallels united by zigzag trenches, the work on which had to be done at night; but he soon gave up the substitut
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
142, 270; losses in, 302. Gettysburg and Vicksburg, 309; removal of dead, 409; compared with Waterloo, 421. Gibbons, General, 244. Gloucester Point, Va., 136. Gooch, Sir, William, mentioned, 5 Field-Marshal, 261, 423. Molino del Rey, 41. Monocacy, battle of, 351. Mont St. Jean, Waterloo, 421. Monroe, James, I. Montezuma's gifts, 31. Moore, Anne, 20. Morales, General, 35.94. Mount Vernon, Va., 71. Napier, General, quoted, 148. Napoleon at Austerlitz, 247; at Waterloo, 278, 421; mentioned, 13, 17. Negro division at Petersburg, 356. New England States, 82. 1, 13, 26, 71, 80, 137. Washington and Lee University, 281, 413. Washington, Mrs., Mary, 26. Waterloo, battle of, 13. Waterloo Bridge, 182, 184, 186. Wellington, Duke of, mentioned, 171, 228, 247, 278; at Waterloo, 343, 420. Webb's brigade at Gettysburg, 295. Webster, Daniel, McClellan's horse, 211. Weed, General, killed at Gettysburg, 302. Weiseger, General, at Petersburg, 360.