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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 18 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 16 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 10 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 10 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Waterloo, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Waterloo, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The charge of the Crater. (search)
ns the Alabama brigade rose at a right-shoulder shift, and moved forward in perfect alignment—slowly at first, until we came in sight of the enemy and received his first fire, and then with a dash to the works. For a moment or two the enemy overshot us and did no damage, but as we reached the works many were struck down and the gaps were apparent, but the alignment remained perfect. It was as handsome a charge as was ever made on any field, and could not have been excelled by the Guard at Waterloo, under Ney. On reaching the works the real fight began. Our men poured over into the Crater, and the ring of steel and bayonet in handto-hand fight began. Men were brained by butts of guns, and run through with bayonets. This melee kept up for at least fifteen minutes, the enemy fighting with desperation because they were impressed with the idea that no quarter would be given. The credit of capturing the Crater and all its contents belongs to Morgan Smith Cleveland, then Adjutant of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
five miles in his line of march. The same difficulties as to roads have attended armies in older and more open and cultivated countries than Eastern Virginia, and have been the instruments of winning or losing many battles. Malvern Hill and Waterloo. A most original and graphic writer, delineating the battle of Waterloo, remarked: Here a general of division fell; near by, brigades with their commanders perished; soon the grand old Imperial Guard, that had never known defeat, hurled its fre, take this road. Blucher, seventy-three years old, fired with the spirit of war and revenge, falling from his horse, but mounting again with the alacrity of youth, presses upon the scene, while Wellington prays that he or night would come. Waterloo was won by the accident of a well-directed route. Malvern Hill was doubtless a drawn battle because the Quaker road was misunderstood. It was a fearful ordeal to pass from under the cover of the hills that fringed the Crew field, and face th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
W. B., 3, 17. Taft, A. W, 130. Thomas, Hon. W. M., 222. Tilman, Heroism of Color-Bearer, 345. Tupper, Lieutenant F., killed, 42. Turner, Lieutenant J. M., 41. Tyler, President, John, 321. Tyrrell, Henry, 77. Valley Campaign, Jackson's, 103. Volunteer Soldier, The, 103. Von Browaer, Baron, 181. Waggaman, Colonel, Eugene, 10th Louisiana Infantry, sketch of, 180. Wall, H. C., 151. Wallace, General W. H., 15. Watterson, Henry, 18. Washington, Colonel L. Q., 193. Waterloo, Battle of, 219. Watkins, Major H. C., 5. West Virginia Campaign, 3. Whitaker's Mill captured, 4. White Horse, Incident of the officer on the, 105. Whiting, Gen. W. H. C., 10, 215. Wiatt, Chaplain W. E., 16. Wilcox, Ella Wheeler, 231. Wilderness, Battle of the, 259, 339. Wilson, Lt., Samuel, 139. Winchester, Battle of, 97. Wise, Barton Haxall, 1, 205. Wise's Brigade, Career of, 1. Wise, Capt., Geo. D., killed, 14. Wise, Gen. Henry A,, 86, ,206. Wise. Gen. Peyt