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Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 78 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 38 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 32 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 22 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for White River (Arkansas, United States) or search for White River (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 4 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 17: evacuation of Fort Pillow and battle of Memphis. (search)
f the Confederate fleet. a brilliant victory. noble action of the commander of the monarch. capture of forts up the White River. explosion of the steam chest of the Mound City. valuable lives lost. saving the crews of the Confederate vessels. ltar at Vicksburg, where the gunboats will catch up with them after a while. Expedition against St. Charles, on the White River. On June 16th, 1862, Rear-Admiral Davis sent an expedition up the White River to destroy some batteries located at White River to destroy some batteries located at St. Charles. The expedition was under the charge of Com. Kilty. and was composed of the gun-boats Mound City, St. Louis, Lexington, and Conestoga, and several transports with troops under Col. Fitch, U. S. A. The Confederates had mounted batter co-operating with the Navy at Island No.10. This victory, though a small one, was very important, as it opened the White River to our gun-boats and transports, and showed the enemy the futility of attempting to bar the way against our vessels wi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 25: capture of Fort Hindman or Arkansas Post. (search)
eption. the fort surrenders. the honor of the defenders of the fort dimmed. Harrowing scenes. terrible loss of life. McClernand on hand. expedition up the White River. St. Charles deserted. munitions of war captured. Grant assumes command of all the forces. The expedition against Arkansas Post arrived at a point four miirectly after the capture of Fort Hindman, Lieutenant-Commander Walker in the De Kalb, and Lieutenant-Commander George Bache in the Cincinnati, were sent up the White River to capture the forts erected there by the Confederates, and General Gorman, U. S. A., accompanied the expedition with troops in the transports On the arrivalyed by fire, all the rolling stock burned, and all the munitions of war placed on board the transports. This was the last expedition necessary to send up the White River for some time. It remained open during the war excepting on several occasions when guerillas infested its banks. The Arkansas River also remained open; its di
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
ne of the gun-boats that had braved the storm of battle at Belmont, Shiloh, Fort Henry, Donelson and Arkansas Post. The Confederates were again assembling in White River, where it was easy for them to get from Little Rock. Arkansas, and escape back again if attacked. Lieutenant-Commander Bache was ordered up White River to suppWhite River to suppress these raiders, whose zeal and persistency seemed without limit. The great Confederate armies of the West appeared to have been divided into small bodies, which could move with greater celerity. The Lexington, Cricket and Marmora were the vessels comprising Lieutenant Bache's command. On the arrival of the expedition at De By these movements of the gun-boats the Confederate transportation on the rivers was broken up — they had not a steamer left in this vicinity except one on the White River. A little later, Volunteer-Lieutenant J. P. Couthouy, commanding the Osage, who had been sent to cruise in Red River, receiving information of a Confederate
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
severely for their temerity. General Shelby showed no want of gallantry, his only fault being that he had not fairly considered the enemy he was about to attack. He had so easily overcome the Queen City that he thought he could do the same with the rest. The result of the fight was that General Steele followed the enemy to Little Rock, Arkansas, on which place General Marmaduke had intended to make a raid; and the Confederates, finding that they could not assemble on the banks of the White River while the gun-boats were so active, transferred their operations to some other quarter. With the exception of some trouble with the guerillas up the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers, the operations for the year 1864 ended favorably for the Union cause, as far as the Navy was concerned. The Confederates continued to show themselves in Kentucky and Tennessee, however, and sometimes took advantage of transports that were not convoyed by gun-boats. Even as late as December, 1864, there wa