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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 78 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 38 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 32 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 22 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for White River (Arkansas, United States) or search for White River (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

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the enemy, and to prevent being cut off also, the Colonel took a different road, swam Cache River, and proceeded directly to Duvall's Bluff, and arrived at the banks opposite this place next day. Major Teed arrived at the bayou, and sent out scouts to find the Colonel, but these returned without having found him, and so we proceeded unmolested, except by the rain, which poured down in torrents, and reached Clarendon at eight o'clock P. M.; camped, and waited for a boat to ferry us across White River. This arrived next day; ferried us across, and so we arrived here last night, much wearied, hungry, and exhausted, but content that it all happened in our three years. Upon arriving, we learned that parts of companies D, F, and G, altogether fifty, and parts of the Third Minnesota and Sixty-first Illinois infantry, under command of Colonel Andrews, the latter having come secretly from Little Rock, had left this place on Steamers Commercial and Raymond at the same time we did, and were to
which the detachment of the Third Minnesota volunteers, under my command, took in the recent expedition and action up White River, under command of Colonel C. C. Andrews, of the Third Minnesota. I received orders from Colonel Andrews at half-pased on the steamer Dove, and at seven o'clock, together with a small force of the Eighth Missouri cavalry, proceeded up White River, reaching Gregory's Landing — which is ten miles above the mouth of the Little Red, and one hundred and ten miles abovEstes--the whole under command of General Andrews--was embarked at Duval's Bluff on the steamer Dove, and proceeded up White River, convoyed by gunboat No. Twenty-five, of the Mosquito Fleet. At Gregory's Landing, sixty-five miles from the Bluff, e dark toward the understood locality of the rebel McRay's camp, five miles distant. After fording the muddy branch of White River, we learned that Ray and his band had gone up the river to attack our transports then on their way to Batesville. R