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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 15 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 4 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909 4 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909. You can also browse the collection for White's Station (Tennessee, United States) or search for White's Station (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909, Company E, 39th Massachusetts Infantry, in the Civil War.—(Iv.) (search)
eld all hostilities suddenly ceased, and later in the day the entire army opposed to us surrendered. We remained here while the paroling of the enemy went on, until Saturday, April 15, when we broke camp and began the return march to Petersburg. Sunday, April 16. We reached Farmville in the afternoon, where we received the sad news of President Lincoln's assassination. A gloom rested on the camp that night which will never be forgotten. Friday, April 21. We reached Black's and White's Station in the forenoon. Camp was laid out and a halt made here. During the following days many of the officers and men of the Regiment, who had been in the hands of the enemy since August, returned from the paroled camp. Major F. R. Kinsley was of this number, and the command of the Regiment now devolved upon him. May 1. We broke camp once more and began the march to Washington; passed through Petersburg May 3; through Richmond May 6; over the memorable Fredericksburg battleground May 9
a D., 30. Warner, N. H., 21. Warren, Isaac, 78. Warren, Major-General, 9. Washington, D. C., 11. Washington, George, 23. Waterford, Me., 34. Waters, Elizabeth A., 72. Watertown, Mass., 87. Watson, William W., 69. Watts, Samuel, 65. Wayne, Charlotte, 30. Wayne, Eliza, 30. Weitzel, General, 53, 59, 60. Weldon Railroad, 5, 6, 7, 14. Welles, Mr., 62. Wentworth, L. Roger, 77. West Cambridge, 44. Western House, 5. Wheeler, Timothy, 77, 78. Whipple, Ann E., 30, 34, 35. White's Station, 11. Whitmore, Joseph W., 19. Whitney. Moses, 43. Wild, Charles D., 66. Wild, George W., 66. Wild, Rebecca, 66. Willard, J., 65. Willcutt, William C., 19. Winchester, Mass., 88. Winter Hill Road, 26. Winter Hill Universalist Church, 72. Winthrop, John, 78. Woburn Academy. 21. Woburn, Mass., 88. Wonohaquaham Tribe of Red Men, Wood, Colonel, 82. Woodbury, Harriette Reed, 37. Wyeth, Nicholas, 88. Wyman's History, 27. Wyman, Nehemiah, 85. Yellow Tavern, 2, 3.