Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Yazoo River (United States) or search for Yazoo River (United States) in all documents.

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Doc. 88.-fight at Liverpool heights, on the Yazoo River. Vicksburgh, Miss., Sunday, March 13, 1864. One of the most successful expeditions ever recorded of our operations in this vicinity, was that sent out on the first of last month, commanded by Colonel James H. Coates, of the Eleventh Illinois infantry. The force consisted of the Eleventh Illinois infantry, Eighth Louisiana infantry, and First Mississippi cavalry--the two latter being colored troops. Lieutenant H. H. Dean, Adjutant of the Eleventh Illinois, kindly furnished me with the following particulars of the campaign: On the thirty-first ultimo, the expedition left Haines's Bluff, and ascended Yazoo River on transports, convoyed by three gunboats, and on the fourth arrived at Liverpool Heights, within eighteen miles of Yazoo City. At this point they found the enemy posted in a strong position on a high bluff, and he immediately opened fire on the gunboats, which were in advance, striking them several times, a
y from Memphis will turn up there. I will have them come in. W. T. Sherman, Major-General. Despatch from General Butterfield. Major-General Butterfield, under date of Cairo, March eleventh, addressed the following to Lieutenant-General Grant or General Halleck: General Sherman arrived yesterday at Memphis. His command is all safe. Our total loss in killed, wounded, and missing is one hundred and seventy only. The general result of his expedition, including Smith's and the Yazoo River movements, are about as follows: One hundred and fifty miles of railroad, sixty-seven bridges, seven thousand feet of trestle, twenty locomotives, twenty-eight cars, ten thousand bales of cotton, several steam-mills, and over two — million bushels of corn were destroyed. The railroad destruction is complete and thorough. The capture of prisoners exceeds all loss. Upward of eight thousand contrabands and refugees came in with various columns. Journal of the March. Vicksburgh, Ma
Doc. 121.-expedition up Yazoo River. Report of rear-admiral D. D. Porter. flag-ship Black Hawk, Mississippi Squadron, Cairo, February 17, 1864. sir: Inclosed I send you a report of Lieutenant Commander Owen, in relation to an expedition I sent up Yazoo River to cooperate with General Sherman, (who is marching on MeridYazoo River to cooperate with General Sherman, (who is marching on Meridian,) and to confuse the enemy with regard to movements on foot. It appears the troops did not consider themselves strong enough to land, and force the position. The vessels will work their way along cautiously until the water is high enough to send an iron-clad or two. This move has had the effect of driving the guerrillas awron, Red River, March 6, 1864. sir: I have the honor to inclose herewith copy of report from Lieutenant Commander E. K. Owen, in relation to movements up the Yazoo River. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Additi