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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 88 2 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 4 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 2 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Yellow River, Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Yellow River, Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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er twenty-third. The Georgia Railroad was destroyed by the Fourteenth corps from Lithonia to Yellow River, and from Social Circle to Madison by the Twentieth corps. It was also broken at several poi seventeenth, moving in the same order of march, and destroying the railroad from Lithonia to Yellow River, the corps went into camp on the west bank of the river and vicinity, late in the evening. g, large foraging parties were organized and sent out under strong guards to the neighborhood of Yellow and South Rivers. They were eminently successful. The four expeditions brought back on an aver of Madison. The country for the first three days march was very hilly, and the crossing at Yellow River, Little Haynes River, and other streams, very bad. The condition of the teams was not good, aecond, Third, and First divisions.-Weather: Fine.--Road: Good but hilly. The crossing of the Yellow River at Rock Bridge bad and easily disputed.--Supplies: Scanty, except some forage and live stock.
o attached to the corps, and was very useful during the march. On the morning of the fifteenth November, the corps marched from Atlanta, taking the road east through Decatur. We encamped on the fifteenth near the Georgia Railroad, south of Stone Mountain; on the evening of the sixteenth, near Rock Bridge Post-Office; on the seventeenth, near Cornish Creek; on the eighteenth, three miles west of Madison. The country for the first three days march was very hilly, and the crossing at Yellow River, Little Haynes River, and other streams, very bad. The condition of the teams was not good, and delays to the rear of our long column were consequently vexatious and protracted. Geary's division was detached, unencumbered, on the morning of the nineteenth, with orders to destroy the Georgia Railroad Bridge over the Oconee River, and such wagon-bridges as he might find on that river toward Milledgeville. The purpose was fully accomplished, and several miles of railroad as well as the l
November16. Order of march: Second, Third, and First divisions.-Weather: Fine.--Road: Good but hilly. The crossing of the Yellow River at Rock Bridge bad and easily disputed.--Supplies: Scanty, except some forage and live stock.--Distance; Eight miles.
On the sixteenth, I marched from Atlanta, via Decatur, to Lithonia, twenty miles. On the twenty-first, I marched to Yellow River, destroying five miles of the Georgia Railroad. The march was continued through Covington to Harris's plantation, whe great abundance, a sufficient quantity of which was gathered by my foraging parties to supply my whole command. Near Yellow River the brigade destroyed two and a half miles of railroad. November nineteenth, we again resumed our march, and on the tCouzens, seventeen miles, and destroying five miles of railroad. November eighteenth, marched at daylight, crossing Yellow River by Covington, to Ulcafouhatchie River, fifteen miles, destroying three miles railroad. November nineteenth, marched marched as far as Shaphinger Creek. From the seventeenth the march was continued through Lithonia, Conyers, crossing Yellow River, through Covington, over the Ulcofahauchee, through Shady Dale, and reaching the city of Milledgeville. On the mornin
for the night. November 16.--It crossed Yellow River and Rock Bridge, and encamped two miles fro, and got into camp on the east side of the Yellow River. November 17.--Marched at eight A. M.; dlry, and about three hundred wagons, across Yellow River, in the direction of Lawrenceville. I founed toward Buckshin at three P. M., crossing Yellow River upon a bridge, which, though partly burned st 11 P. M. It encamped on the left bank of Yellow River, near Rock Bridge Post-Office about midnightions to the vicinity of Stone Mountain and Yellow River, once under command of Colonel Robinson, co. M., one mile from Rockbridge. We crossed Yellow River and encamped for the night, after marching les, and bivouacked about eight P. M., near Yellow River, the regiment doing picket-duty for the divntain, and camping for night a mile east of Yellow River, at Rockbridge. 17th. Broke camp at halDecatur, passed Stone Mountain, crossed the Yellow River; through Rockbridge to Social Circle; from [16 more...]
th six companies, commanded by myself, marched from Atlanta the morning of the sixteenth, with the Fourteenth corps, moving on the Decatur road. 17th. After a march of twenty miles, threw two bridges (one hundred and twenty feet each) over Yellow River. 18th. In the afternoon took up one of my bridges, moved it forward to the Ulcofauhatchee, where it was re-thrown. The remaining bridge over Yellow River being ordered forward under charge of Major Downey, reached my camp late in the nighYellow River being ordered forward under charge of Major Downey, reached my camp late in the night. 19th. Dismantled the bridge over the Ulcofauhatchee, and marched eighteen miles, during the day. 20th, 21st, and 22d, were passed in marching. 23d. Reached and encamped in the city of Milledgeville. 24th. Marched at nine o'clock A. M., moving on the road to Sandersville. 25th. Moved forward a few miles to Buffalo Creek. Over this stream we threw a pontoonbridge, and also built one small trestle-bridge during the night. 26th. Took up the pontoon-bridge and marched the s
or A. Lincoln, and one hundred and thirty-one for General McClellan. November fifteenth, left Atlanta, Georgia, nothing of importance transpiring; camped near Stone Mountain at four P. M. Sixteenth, nothing of importance transpiring; camped at Yellow River at twelve P. M. Seventeenth, nothing of importance transpiring, camped five miles from Hot Creek at twelve P. M.; roads bad, forage plenty. Eighteenth, rear-guard; left camp at half-past 7 A. M. Passed though Social Circle at noon, crossed thcement of the recent campaign. On the morning of November fifteenth, we broke camp, and joined the First brigade on the Decatur road. Marching fifteen miles, we halted near Stone Mountain, and camped for the night. Sixteenth, marched across Yellow River. Guarding ammunition-train. Halted at half-past 11 P. M., for the night. Seventeenth, commenced the march at ten A. M. Guarding train. Camped at half-past 12 P. M. Eighteenth, marched at nine A. M. Halted at Social Circle, at two P. M., fo
similar expedition, under General John W. Geary, commanding Second division, Twentieth corps, to the vicinity of Yellow River, Georgia; returning to our previous camp on the twenty-ninth, resuming our regular routine of picket, fatigue-duty, etc. at twelve P. M., near Stone Mountain. 16th. Moved at eight A. M.; led the corps. Marched fifteen miles, crossing Yellow River at Rock Bridge, and halting for the night five miles beyond it on the Sheffield road. 17th. Moved at half-past 6 Aoint Railroad to and from East-Point. 26th. The regiment, with other troops, went on a foraging expedition to Yellow River, Georgia, and returned the twenty-ninth, having met with good success, and filling five hundred wagons with forage. The ie eleventh of October, when, with the brigade, it proceeded as a portion of an expedition sent out in the direction of Yellow River, for forage. A large amount of forage was obtained, very fortunately, supplying the command when much needed. Seco