hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Epictetus, Works (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson) 18 0 Browse Search
Plato, Parmenides, Philebus, Symposium, Phaedrus 14 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 10 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley). You can also browse the collection for Zeno (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Zeno (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley), book 2, Damasippus, in a conversation with Horace, proves this paradox of the Stoic philosophy, that most men are actually mad. (search)
dishonor his character. how you do any thing unworthy of yourself; a false shame, says he, afflicts you, who dread to be esteemed a madman among madmen. For in the first place I will inquire, what it is to be mad: and, if this distemper be in you exclusively, I will not add a single word, to prevent you from dying bravely. The school and sect of Chrysippus Chrysippi porticus. The Porticus was a famous gallery at Athens, where Zeno held his school, which, from the Greek word sto/a, Porticus, took the name of Stoic. deem every man mad, whom vicious folly or the ignorance of truth drives blindly forward. This definition takes in whole nations, this even great kings, the wise man [alone] excepted. Now learn, why all those, who have fixed the name of madman upon you, are as senseless as yourself. As in the woods, where a mistake makes people wander about from the proper path; one goes