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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 14 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 8 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More). You can also browse the collection for Palatine (Italy) or search for Palatine (Italy) in all documents.

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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 14, line 609 (search)
etus. And reigning after them King Tiberinus followed. He was drowned in waves of that Etrurian stream, to which he gave his name. His sons were Remulus and fierce Acrota—each in turn was king. The elder, Remulus, would imitate the lightning, and he perished by a flash of lightning. Then Acrota, not so rash, succeeded to his brother, and he left his scepter to the valiant Aventinus, hill-buried on the very mountain which he ruled upon and which received his name. And Proca ruled then—on the Palatine. Under this king, Pomona lived, and none of all the Latin hamadryads could attend her garden with more skill, and none was more attentive to the fruitful trees, because of them her name was given to her. She cared not for the forests or the streams, but loved the country and the boughs that bear delicious fruit. Her right hand never felt a javelin's weight, always she loved to hold a sharp curved pruning-knife with which she would at one time crop too largely growing shoots, or at another t
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 15, line 552 (search)
d Hippolytus with wonder, just as great as when the Etrurian ploughman saw a fate-revealing clod move of its own accord among the fields, while not a hand was touching it, till finally it took a human form, without the quality of clodded earth, and opened its new mouth and spoke, revealing future destinies. The natives called him Tages. He was the first who taught Etrurians to foretell events. They were astonished even as Romulus, when he observed the spear, which once had grown high on the Palatine, put out new leaves and stand with roots—not with the iron point which he had driven in. Not as a spear it then stood there, but as a rooted tree with limber twigs for many to admire while resting under that surprising shade. Or, as when Cippus first observed his horns in the clear stream (he truly saw them there). Believing he had seen a falsity, he often touched his forehead with his hand and, so returning, touched the thing he saw. Assured at last that he could trust his eyes, he stood e