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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 14 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 8 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding). You can also browse the collection for Palatine (Italy) or search for Palatine (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding), Book 14, line 320 (search)
ng the Latian hilles. The nymphes of fountaines and of brookes, As those that haunted Albula were ravisht with his lookes And so were they that Numicke beares, and Anio too, and Alme That ronneth short, and heady Nar, and Farfar coole and calme. And all the nymphes that usde to haunt Dianas shadye poole, Or any lakes or meeres neere hand, or other waters coole. But he disdeyning all the rest did set his love uppon A lady whom Venilia bare (so fame reporteth) on The stately mountayne Palatine by Janus that dooth beare The dowble face. Assoone as that her yeeres for maryage were Thought able, shee preferring him before all other men, Was wedded to this Picus whoo was king of Lawrents then. Shee was in beawtve excellent, but yit in singing, much More excellent: and theruppon they naamd her Singer. Such The sweetenesse of her musicke was, that shee therwith delyghts The savage beastes, and caused birdes to cease theyr wandring flyghts, And moved stones and trees, and made the ro
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding), Book 14, line 609 (search)
e scepter of the Realme Descended unto Tyberine, whoo drowning in the streame Of Tyber left that name thereto. This Tyberine begat Feerce Remulus and Acrota. By chaunce it hapned that The elder brother Remulus for counterfetting oft The thunder, with a thunderbolt was killed from aloft. From Acrota whoose stayednesse did passe his brothers skill, The crowne did come to Aventine, whoo in the selfsame hill In which he reygned buryed lyes, and left therto his name. The rule of nation Palatine at length to Proca came. In this Kings reigne Pomona livd. There was not to bee found Among the woodnymphes any one in all the Latian ground That was so conning for to keepe an Ortyard as was shee, Nor none so paynefull to preserve the frute of every tree. And theruppon shee had her name. Shee past not for the woodes Nor rivers, but the villages and boughes that bare bothe buddes And plentuous frute. In sted of dart a shredding hooke shee bare, With which the overlusty boughes shee eft
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding), Book 15, line 552 (search)
As when the Tyrrhene Tilman sawe in earing of his land The fatall clod first stirre alone without the help of hand, And by and by forgoing quyght the earthly shape of clod, To take the seemely shape of man, and shortly like a God To tell of things as then to comme. The Tyrrhenes did him call By name of Tages. He did teach the Tuskanes first of all To gesse by searching bulks of beastes what after should befall. Or like as did king Romulus when soodeinly he found His lawnce on mountayne Palatine fast rooted in the ground, And bearing leaves, no longer now a weapon but a tree, Which shadowed such as woondringly came thither for to see. Or else as Cippus when he in the ronning brooke had seene His homes. For why he saw them, and supposing there had beene No credit to bee given unto the glauncing image, hee Put oft his fingers to his head, and felt it so to bee. And blaming now no more his eyes, in comming from the chase With conquest of his foes, he stayd. And lifting up his face