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Pausanias, Description of Greece 104 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 24 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 22 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 12 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 12 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 6 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Orestes (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 6 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 6 0 Browse Search
Sophocles, Electra (ed. Sir Richard Jebb) 4 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aeschines, Speeches. You can also browse the collection for Phocis (Greece) or search for Phocis (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 6 document sections:

Aeschines, On the Embassy, section 9 (search)
and after treating a man with such contempt, later, when it suits his whim, he turns about, and as though he were accusing an Alcibiades or a Themistocles, the most famous men among all the Greeks, he proceeds to charge that same man with having destroyed the cities in Phocis, with having lost you the Thracian coast, with having expelled from his kingdom Cersobleptes, a friend and ally of the city.
Aeschines, On the Embassy, section 103 (search)
ted it to some of its petty servants and sent them. But to reach a right solution of the supreme question, so far as that is in our power or Philip's,The supreme question of the hour was the settlement of the long continued Phocian war. Whether Phocis was to be defeated and Thebes given a dangerous increase of power depended in large measure on what action Philip and the Athenians should decide to take, either jointly or severally. The Athenians had been unable to persuade Philip's ambassadorhe Athenians had been unable to persuade Philip's ambassadors to include the Phocians among the states to be protected by the peace, but it was hoped that these ambassadors from Athens would be able to persuade Philip himself to favour Phocis as against Thebes. this is now a task for wise ambassadors. I mean,” said I, “the question of the expedition to Thermopylae, which you see in course of preparation. That I am not wide of the mark in this matter, I will show you by weighty considerati
Aeschines, On the Embassy, section 131 (search)
Now all this is the invention of my accuser. It was fortune, first of all, that ruined the Phocians, and she is mistress of all things; and secondly, it was the long continuance of the ten years' war. For the same thing that built up the power of the tyrants in Phocis, destroyed it also: they established themselves in power by daring to lay hands on the treasures of the shrine, and by the use of mercenaries they put down the free governments; and it was lack of funds that caused their overthrow, when they had spent all their resources on these mercenaries.
Aeschines, On the Embassy, section 142 (search)
For if there were any truth in these assertions of yours, the Boeotian fugitives, for whose expulsion I was responsible, and the Phocian exiles, whose restoration I prevented, would be accusing me now. But as a matter of fact they ignore the misfortunes that have come upon them, and satisfied with my loyalty to them, the Boeotian exiles have held a meeting and chosen men to speak in my behalf; and from the towns of Phocis have come ambassadors whose lives I saved when I was representing you before the Amphictyons on the third embassy; for when the representatives from Oetaea went so far as to say that they ought to cast the grown men over the cliffs, I brought the Phocians into the assembly of the Amphictyons and secured a hearing for them. For Phalaecus had made terms for himself and gone, and those who were guiltless were on the point of being put to death; but I pleaded for them, and their lives were spared.
Aeschines, On the Embassy, section 162 (search)
Yes, my accuser says, because I joined Philip in singing paeans when the cities of Phocis had been razed.Dem. 19.128 What evidence could be sufficient to prove that charge? I was, indeed, invited to receive the ordinary courtesies, as were my colleagues in the embassy. Those who were invited and were present at the banquet, including the ambassadors from other Hellenic states, were not less than two hundred. And so it seems that among all these I was conspicuous, not by my silence, but by joining in the singing—for Demosthenes says so, who was not there himself, and presents no witness from among those who wer
Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 140 (search)
But, I think, when Philip had taken NicaeaNicea was an important strategic post at the eastern end of the Pass of Thermopylae. from them and given it to the Thessalians, and when he was now bringing back again upon Thebes herself through Phocis the same war that he had formerly driven from the borders of Boeotia,Aeschines represents the Amphissian war as virtually a resumption of the Phocian war; both were wars in behalf of the Delphic shrine, but the relation of Thebes to the two was very different. and when finally he had seized Elateia and fortified and garrisoned it,After passing through Thermopylae, Philip seized Elateia in northern Phocis and made it his base for the winter. It commanded the main road towards Thebes and Athens. For the Athenian feeling of the significance of its seizure, see the famous passage in the speech of Demosthenes, On the Crown, Dem. 19.168 ff. then, and not till then, it was, when the peril was laying hold on them, that they sent for the Athenian