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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 102 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 60 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Phoenissae (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 32 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Rhesus (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 32 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 28 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 24 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs) 22 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Rhesus (ed. Gilbert Murray) 20 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Orestes (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 16 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aeschylus, Agamemnon (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.). You can also browse the collection for Argive (Greece) or search for Argive (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Aeschylus, Agamemnon (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.), line 538 (search)
ey will never care even to wake to life again.Why should we count the number of the slain, or why should the living feel pain at their past harsh fortunes? Our misfortunes should, in my opinion, bid us a long farewell. For us, the remnant of the Argive host, the gain has the advantage and the loss does not bear down the scale;so that, as we speed over land and sea, it is fitting that we on this bright day make this boast:Or “to this light of the sun.”“The Argive army, having taken Troy at last,speed over land and sea, it is fitting that we on this bright day make this boast:Or “to this light of the sun.”“The Argive army, having taken Troy at last, has nailed up these spoils to be a glory for the gods throughout Hellas in their shrines from days of old.”Whoever hears the story of these deeds must extol the city and the leaders of her host; and the grace of Zeus that brought them to accomplishment shall receive its due measure of gratitude. There, you have heard all that
Aeschylus, Agamemnon (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.), line 636 (search)
d to death by the two-handled whip beloved of Ares, destruction double-armed, a gory pair—when, I say, he is packed with woes like this,he should sing the triumph-song of the Avenging Spirits. But when one comes with glad news of deliverance to a city rejoicing in its happiness—how shall I mix fair with foul in telling of the storm, not unprovoked by the gods' wrath, that broke upon the Achaeans?For fire and sea, beforehand bitterest of foes, swore alliance and as proof destroyed the unhappy Argive army. In the night-time arose the mischief from the cruel swells. Beneath blasts from Thrace ship dashed against ship;and they, gored violently by the furious hurricane and rush of pelting rain, were swept out of sight by the whirling gust of an evil shepherd.The “evil shepherd” is the storm that drives the ships, like sheep, from their course.But when the radiant light of the sun rose we beheld the Aegean flowering with corpsesof Achaean men and wreckage of ships. Ourselves, however, and
Aeschylus, Agamemnon (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.), line 810 (search)
o thebloody urn their ballots for the murderous destroying of Ilium; but to the urn of acquittal that no hand filled, Hope alone drew near. The smoke even now still declares the city's fall. Destruction's blasts still live, andthe embers, as they die, breathe forth rich fumes of wealth. For this success we should render to the gods a return in ever-mindful gratitude, seeing that we have thrown round the city the toils of vengeance, and in a woman's cause it has been laid low by the fierce Argive beast,brood of the horse,The wooden horse.a shield-armed folk, that launched its leap when the Pleiades waned. Vaulting over its towered walls, the ravening lion lapped up his fill of princely blood. For the gods then I have stretched out this prelude.But, touching your sentiments—which I heard and still bear in memory—I both agree and you have in me an advocate. For few there are among men in whom it is inborn to admire without envy a friend's good fortune. For the venom of malevolence s