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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 102 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 60 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Rhesus (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 32 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Phoenissae (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 32 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 28 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 24 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs) 22 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Rhesus (ed. Gilbert Murray) 20 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Orestes (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 16 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aeschylus, Eumenides (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.). You can also browse the collection for Argive (Greece) or search for Argive (Greece) in all documents.

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Aeschylus, Eumenides (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.), line 276 (search)
umbering and fading from my hand,the pollution of matricide is washed away; while it was still fresh, it was driven away at the hearth of the god Phoebus by purifying sacrifices of swine. It would be a long story to tell from the beginning, how many people I have visited, with no harm from association with me.[Time purges all things, aging with them.] So now with a pure mouth I piously invoke Athena, lady of this land, to come to my aid. Without the spear, she will win me and my land and the Argive peopleas faithful and true allies for all time. But whether in some region of the Libyan land, near the waters of Triton, her native stream, she is in action or at rest,Literally, “she places her foot upright or covered over.” The poet may have in mind statues of the goddess: o)rqo/n referring to upright posture, kathrefh= to her long garment falling over her foot when she was represented as sitting. aiding those whom she loves, or whether, like a bold marshal, she is surveying the Phlegraea
Aeschylus, Eumenides (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.), line 436 (search)
pliant in need of purification, nor did I sit at your image with pollution on my hands.I will give you strong proof of this. It is the law for one who is defiled by shedding blood to be barred from speech until he is sprinkled with the blood of a new-born victim by a man who can purify from murder.Long before at other houses I have been thus purified both by victims and by flowing streams. And so I declare that this concern is out of the way. As to my family, you will soon learn. I am an Argive; my father—you rightly inquire about him—was Agamemnon, the commander of the naval forces; along with him, you made Troy, the city of Ilion, to be no city. He did not die nobly, after he came home; but my black-hearted mother killed him after she covered him in a crafty snare that still remains to witness his murder in the bath.And when I came back home, having been an exile in the time before, I killed the woman who gave birth to me, I will not deny it, as the penalty in return for the murd
Aeschylus, Eumenides (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.), line 744 (search)
allots cast forth, friends, and be in awe of doing wrong in the division of the votes. Error of judgment is the source of much distress,and the cast of a single ballot has set upright a house.The ballots are shown to Athena. Athena This man is acquitted on the charge of murder, for the numbers of the casts are equal.Apollo disappears. Orestes Pallas, savior of my house! I was deprived of a fatherland, and it is you who have given me a home there again.The Hellenes will say, “The man is an Argive once again, and lives in his father's heritage, by the grace of Pallas and of Loxias and of that third god, the one who accomplishes everything, the savior”—the one who, having respect for my father's death,saves me, seeing those advocates of my mother. I will return to my home now, after I swear an oath to this land and to your peopleThe passage points to the league between Athens and Argos, formed after Cimon was ostracized (461 B.C.) and the treaty with Sparta denounced. for the fu