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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 22 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 20 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 16 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 10 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 8 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 6 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 6 0 Browse Search
Isaeus, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 4 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Politics. You can also browse the collection for Cnidus (Turkey) or search for Cnidus (Turkey) in all documents.

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Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1305b (search)
those who did not share in the magistracies raised disturbances until as a first stage the older brothers were admitted, and later the younger ones again (for in some places a father and a son may not hold office together, and in others an elder and a younger brother may not). At Marseilles the oligarchy became more constitutional, while at Istrus it ended in becoming democracy, and in Heraclea the government passed from a smaller number to six hundred. At Cnidus also there was a revolutionPerhaps not the same as the one mentioned at 1306b 3. of the oligarchy caused by a faction formed by the notables against one another, because few shared in the government, and the rule stated held, that if a father was a member a son could not be, nor if there were several brothers could any except the eldest; for the common people seized the opportunity of their quarrel and, taking a champion from among the notables, fell upon
Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1306b (search)
and those at Thebes did so against Archias; for their personal enemies stirred up party feeling against them so as to get them bound in the pillory in the market-place. Also many governments have been put down by some of their members who had become resentful because the oligarchies were too despotic; this is how the oligarchies fell at CnidusSee 1305b 13 n. and at Chios. And revolutions also occur from an accident, both in what is called a constitutional government and in those oligarchies in which membership of the council and the law-courts and tenure of the other offices are based on a property-qualification. For often the qualification first having been fixed to suit the circumstances of the time, so that in an oligarchy a few may be members and in a constitutional government the middle classes, when peace or some other good fortune leads to a good harvest it comes about that the same properties become worth m