hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 4 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 4 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Economics 2 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 2 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 2 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 2 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Aeolis (Turkey) or search for Aeolis (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
roneus, and fled to the Curetian country. There he killed his hosts, Dorus and Laodocus and Polypoetes, the sons of Phthia and Apollo, and called the country Aetolia after himself.Compare Paus. 5.1.8; Conon 14. Aetolus and Pronoe, daughter of Phorbus, had sons, Pleuron and Calydon, after whom the cities in Aetolia were named. Pleuron wedded Xanthippe, daughter of Dorus, and begat a son Agenor, and daughters, Sterope and Stratonice and Laophonte. Calydon and Aeolia, daughter of Amythaon, had daughters, Epicaste and Protogenia, who had Oxylus by Ares. And Agenor, son of Pleuron, married Epicaste, daughter of Calydon, and begat Porthaon and Demonice, who had Evenus, Molus, Pylus, and Thestius by Ares. Evenus begat Marpessa, who was wooed by Apollo, but Idas, son of Aphareus, carried her off in a winged chariot which he received from Poseidon.As to Evenus and Marpessa, see Scholiast on Hom. Il. ix.557; Eu
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
e animals to the ships, and sailing away shouted to the Cyclops that he was Ulysses and that he had escaped out of his hands. Now the Cyclops had been forewarned by a soothsayer that he should be blinded by Ulysses; and when he learned the name, he tore away rocks and hurled them into the sea, and hardly did the ship evade the rocks. From that time Poseidon was wroth with Ulysses. Having put to sea with all his ships, he came to the island of Aeolia, of which the king was Aeolus.As to the adventures of Ulysses with Aeolus, the Keeper of the Winds, see Hom. Od. 10.1-76; Hyginus, Fab. 125; Ov. Met. 14.223-232. He was appointed by Zeus keeper of the winds, both to calm them and to send them forth. Having entertained Ulysses, he gave him an oxhide bag in which he had bound fast the winds, after showing what winds to use on the voyage and binding fast the bag in the vessel. And by using suitable winds Ulyss