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Pausanias, Description of Greece 58 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 14 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 12 0 Browse Search
Hyperides, Speeches 10 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 10 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 4 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 0 Browse Search
Lycurgus, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More). You can also browse the collection for Troezen (Greece) or search for Troezen (Greece) in all documents.

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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 6, line 412 (search)
The lords of many cities that were near, now met together and implored their kings to mourn with Pelops those unhappy deeds.— The lords of Argos; Sparta and Mycenae; and Calydon, before it had incurred the hatred of Diana, goddess of the chase; fertile Orchomenus and Corinth, great in wealth of brass; Patrae and fierce Messena; Cleone, small; and Pylus and Troezen, not ruled by Pittheus then,—and also, all the other cities which are shut off by the Isthmus there dividing by its two seas, and all the cities which are seen from there. What seemed most wonderful, of all those towns Athens alone was wanting, for a war had gathered from the distant seas, a host of savage warriors had alarmed her walls, and hindered her from mourning for the dead. Now Tereus, then the mighty king of Thrace, came to the aid of Athens as defense from that fierce horde; and there by his great deeds achieved a glorious fame. Since his descent was boasted from the mighty Gradivus, and he was gifted with enor
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 15, line 479 (search)
u much, and I may fail to prove what I declare, but I am he! Long since the daughter of Pasiphae tempted me to defile my father's bed and, failing, feigned that I had wished to do what she herself had wished. Perverting truth— either through fear of some discovery or else through spite at her deserved repulse— she charged me with attempting the foul crime. “Though I was guiltless of all wrong, my father banished me and, while I was departing, laid on me a mortal curse. Towards Pittheus and Troezen I fled aghast, guiding the swift chariot near the shore of the Corinthian Gulf, when all at once the sea rose up and seemed to arch itself and lift high as a white topped mountain height, make bellowings, and open at the crest. Then through the parting waves a horned bull emerged with head and breast into the wind, spouting white foam from his nostrils and his mouth. “The hearts of my attendants quailed with fear, yet I unfrightened thought but of my exile. Then my fierce horses turned