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Pausanias, Description of Greece 24 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 12 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 8 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 6 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 4 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 4 0 Browse Search
Isaeus, Speeches 4 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 4 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Aegospotami (Turkey) or search for Aegospotami (Turkey) in all documents.

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Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
ng up in the sky till it is lost in the light of heaven, while the mortal twin (Castor) was identified with the Evening Star, which is seen at dusk sinking into its earthy bed. See J. G. Welcker, Griechische Götterlehre, i.606ff.; Rendel Harris, The Dioscuri in the Christian Legends (London, 1903), pp. 11ff. It would seem that this view of the Spartan twins was favoured by the Spartans themselves, for after their great naval victory of Aegospotami, at which Castor and Pollux were said to have appeared visibly in or hovering over the Spartan fleet, the victors dedicated at Delphi the symbols of their divine champions in the shape of two golden stars, which shortly before the fatal battle of Leuctra fell down and disappeared, as if to announce that the star of Sparta's fortune was about to set for ever. See Cicero, De divinatione i.34.75, ii.32.68. The same interpretation of the twins would