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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 452 6 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 260 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 174 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 117 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 107 7 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 89 17 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 85 83 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 77 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 72 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) or search for Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: reduction of Newbern—the Albemarle. (search)
f water, and open fire without delay; the monitors to anchor astern one length apart, directly in line along the shore. The large ships to anchor in five fathoms of water, in line of battle to the eastward of the ironclads, and heading parallel with the land (south half west). The Minnesota, leading this line, on signal to take position will go ahead slowly and anchor about one mile from Fort Fisher, opening fire when she passes the Ironsides, and anchoring when her after guns firing on Fisher will clear the range of the Ironsides; the Mohican, next in line, will then anchor ahead of the Minnesota, Colorado next ahead of her, and all of the line thus when anchored in reverse of order of sailing. The Seneca, Shenandoah, and six other vessels will take their positions between and outside the different vessels as marked on the plan. After the vessels above designated have got into position, the Nyack, Unadilla, Huron, and Pequot will take up position outside and between the mo
Canonicus, Saugus, and Mahopac, of more recent construction than the Passaic class, and possessed more power of resistance to projectiles. The fleet, accompanied by numerous army transports, anchored during the night some twelve miles east of Fisher. In the morning, the Ironsides and her consorts proceeded at once to get under way toward Fort Fisher, and following in on their former range lines anchored as near that work as the depth of water would permit. This brought the Ironsides within from Colonel Lamb to Parker is given in the foot-note. Norfolk, Va., January 15, 1879. Captain James Parker: Dear Sir—In reply to your recent letter, I would state that I was colonel in command of the Confederate garrison of Fort Fisher, North Carolina, upon the occasion of its assault and capture by the United States forces on this day fourteen years ago. The attacking column of the army was hid and protected by the river bank as it approached the left flank of the work, but the nav
(note) Fanny, the, U. S tug, 165, 169, 172, 184, et seq. Farragut, Rear-Admiral, 215 et seq. Faunce, Captain, John, 165 Febiger, Commander, 204, 209 (note) Fellows, Colonel, 63 Fernandina, Fla., 48 et seq. Fingal, the, 120 Fisher, Signal Officer, 178 Fisher, Fort, see Fort Fisher. Flag, the, U. S. steamer, 81 Flusser, Lieutenant-Commanding C. W., 177, 184 189, 194, 199 et seq. Foote, Admiral, 122 Forrest, the, Confederate steamer, 185 Fort Beauregard, Fisher, Fort, see Fort Fisher. Flag, the, U. S. steamer, 81 Flusser, Lieutenant-Commanding C. W., 177, 184 189, 194, 199 et seq. Foote, Admiral, 122 Forrest, the, Confederate steamer, 185 Fort Beauregard, 22, 27; abandoned, 28 et seq., 101 Fort Clinch, desertion of, 50 et seq. Fort Donelson, the, 229 Fort Fisher, 217, 219 et seq. Fort Jackson, the, 218, 228 Fort McAllister, 85 et seq. Fort Moultrie, 4, 91 et seq., 131 et seq., 134, 137, 146 et seq., 151, 156, 165 Fort Pulaski, surrender of, 61 et seq. Fort Sumter, S. C., 2, 4 et seq., 11, 16; attack on, 90 et seq., 130 et seq., 141, 146, 148 Fort Wagner, 126 et seq., 131, 133 et seq., 145 Fort Walker, attack on