hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 260 6 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 124 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 104 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 82 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 78 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 75 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 72 50 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 70 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 70 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 69 7 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) or search for Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 29 results in 6 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 15: capture of Fort Donelson and battle of Shiloh. (search)
atteries along the banks; also to assure the inhabitants that they would be protected by the Federal government, and that the Confederates would soon be driven out of the State. These, however, are mere details of duty which cannot be brought out in a history of this kind. The fall of Forts Henry and Donelson compelled the Confederates to change their plans almost immediately. Their line of defense was moved farther South and was now established on the following points: Island No.10, Fort Pillow and Memphis on the Mississippi, a point in Tennessee near Pittsburg, and the town of Chattanooga. All of these points were strongly fortified and defended by large armies, thus closing up East Tennessee, and preventing our armies from marching southward. On the 15th of February, Gen. Grant was assigned to the new military district of West Tennessee, with limits undefined, and Gen. W. T. Sherman to the command of the district of Cairo. Grant commenced at once to concentrate his forc
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 16: operations on the Mississippi. (search)
and surrender of Island no.10. advance on Fort Pillow by the Army and Navy. attack on Fort PilloFort Pillow. evacuation of Fort Pillow by the Confederates. battle between the enemy's rams and the Union gworks opened the Mississippi all the way to Fort Pillow, another stronghold which could only be cons protected by gun-boats, now moved towards Fort Pillow, and prepared to attack the enemy's works. ough the Arkansas shore to a point opposite Fort Pillow, and thus pass some of the gun-boats below Pope with nearly all his force from before Fort Pillow, to proceed to Pittsburg Landing by order oilla to New Madrid, and leave to-morrow for Fort Pillow, or the next point down the river which maygaged in active operations. The heights of Fort Pillow had been repeatedly shelled by the gun-boatfitted as rams, came around the point above Fort Pillow and steamed up the river, evidently preparevessels, rendering her helpless Battle of Fort Pillow. First position. for the time being. All t[6 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 17: evacuation of Fort Pillow and battle of Memphis. (search)
Chapter 17: evacuation of Fort Pillow and battle of Memphis. Bombardment and evacuation of Fort Pillow. Col. Ellet's ram flotilla. capture of a Confederate transport. the vessels compoFort Pillow. Col. Ellet's ram flotilla. capture of a Confederate transport. the vessels composing the Confederate fleet. battle of Memphis. capture of the City. destruction of the Confederate fleet. a brilliant victory. noble action of the commander of the monarch. capture of forts up After this river battle, Flag-officer Davis commenced a heavy and continuous bombardment of Fort Pillow, which lasted up to the 4th of June, and gave the enemy great annoyance, although he continuee more the base of operations was to undergo a change in obedience to the law of strategy. Fort Pillow had to be evacuated, and when the Confederates did evacuate a position they generally did so assigned a proper position to Col. Ellet, and the combined fleet proceeded down the river to Fort Pillow, which they found to be abandoned. Capt. Davis sent for Col. Fitch U. S. A. and turned ove
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 26: siege of Vicksburg. (search)
meo, Juliet. Forest Rose, and Marmora, light-draughts; the Taylor and Black Hawk, wooden armed steamers; Queen of the West, Monarch, Switzerland, and Lioness, rams; During the following month the Lafayette and Indianola, iron-clads, joined the fleet. The carpenter shops, machine shops, provision boats, ordnance department, hospital, etc., (all on large steamers) were ordered to the mouth of the Yazoo; also ten of the mortar boats which had been used by Foote and Davis at Island No.10 and Fort Pillow. Besides these, there were a number of tin-clads with light batteries stationed all along the river from Cairo to Vicksburg, each vessel having its beat. In this manner the Army transports were conveyed from one station to another, and the gun-boats performed this duty so efficiently that during the whole siege of seven months, the transportation of troops and stores was not interrupted. The guerillas along the bank were so handled by these small vessels, and so summarily dealt wit
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
e vessel, and felt sure that the Eastport would soon be afloat again. He was detained a day in Alexandria, making a new disposition of the naval forces on the Mississippi and its tributaries. During his absence up Red River the massacre at Fort Pillow had occurred, in consequence of the policy pursued of not properly garrisoning the strong points, where so much blood and treasure had been expended. There were two small gun-boats at Fort Pillow at the time, which did their part, but the gFort Pillow at the time, which did their part, but the garrison could make but feeble resistance. The Essex, Benton, Choctaw, Lafayette, Ouchita, and Avenger were sent to secure the fort against further attacks. The Eastport was much more shattered by the explosion than had been imagined. Lieutenant-Commander Phelps and his officers worked with a will to save this valuable vessel, and more energy and determination were never evinced. Phelps was satisfied, if time were allowed, that the Eastport would be floated off all right. As the Admiral h
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
report of commission on Singer's torpedoes. capture of Yazoo City. three sailors distinguish themselves. capture of Fort Pillow. horrible massacre. atrocities committed. Fort Pillow retaken by Lieutenant-Commander Fitch. Confederates capture Fort Pillow retaken by Lieutenant-Commander Fitch. Confederates capture the Petrel. the Exchange attacked by masked batteries. batteries near Simmsport open on gun-boats, but are silenced. Confederates make good use of cannon captured from banks. zeal and bravery of Louisiana and Texas troops. the General Bragg att; but when Colonel Lawrence, who commanded the post, refused to listen to a demand for its surrender, they turned upon Fort Pillow, and captured it after a desperate conflict. Fort Pillow was retaken by Lieutenant-Commander Fitch, but the enemy cFort Pillow was retaken by Lieutenant-Commander Fitch, but the enemy carried off with them everything it had contained in the shape of guns or stores, and retreated to Ashport. The Union transports then landed troops at the foot of the hill, who reoccupied the fort, where traces of the massacre were still visible, an