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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 34 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 26 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 18 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 12 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 10 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 10 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Phoenissae (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 8 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 6 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 6 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller). You can also browse the collection for Phoenicia or search for Phoenicia in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 1, chapter 1 (search)
Illyrian with his Illyrians, and so also all other nations, we are told. Those in Europe, at any rate, are said to be free and independent of one another even to this day. But Cyrus, finding the nations in Asia also independent in exactly the same way, started out with a little band of Persians and became the leader of the Medes by their full consent and of the HyrcaniansThe extent of his kingdom by theirs; he then conquered Syria, Assyria, Arabia, Cappadocia, both Phrygias, Lydia, Caria, Phoenicia, and Babylonia; he ruled also over Bactria, India, and Cilicia; and he was likewise king of the Sacians, Paphlagonians, Magadidae, and very many other nations, of which one could not even tell the names; he brought under his sway the Asiatic Greeks also; and, descending to the sea, he added both Cyprus and Egypt to his empire. He ruled over these nations, even though theyThe secret of his power did not speak the same language as he, nor one nation the same as another; for all that, he was
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 6, chapter 2 (search)
They reported also that many Thracian swordsmen had already been hired and that Egyptians were under sail to join them, and they gave the number as one hundred and twenty thousand men armed with shields that came to their feet, with huge spears, such as they carry even to this day, and with sabres. Besides these, there was also the Cyprian army. The Cilicians were all present already, they said, as were also the contingents from both Phrygias, Lycaonia, Paphlagonia, Cappadocia, Arabia, and Phoenicia; the Assyrians were there under the king of Babylon; the Ionians also and the Aeolians and almost all the Greek colonists in Asia had been compelled to join Croesus, and Croesus had even sent to Lacedaemon to negotiate an alliance. This army, they said, was being mustered at the River Pactolus, but it was their intention to advance to Thymbrara, where even to-day is the rendezvous of the king's barbarians from the interior. And a general call had been issued to bring provisions to market t