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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 18 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 16 0 Browse Search
Plato, Alcibiades 1, Alcibiades 2, Hipparchus, Lovers, Theages, Charmides, Laches, Lysis 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10. You can also browse the collection for Potidaea (Greece) or search for Potidaea (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 17 document sections:

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Demosthenes, Olynthiac 1, section 9 (search)
Once again, when news came of the siege of Pydna, of Potidaea, of Methone, of Pagasae,In 357, 356, 354, and 352 respectively. and of the rest of them—not to weary you with a complete catalogue—if we had at that time shown the required zeal in marching to the help of the first that appealed, we should have found Philip today much more humble and accommodating. Unfortunately we always neglect the present chance and imagine that the future will right itself, and so, men of Athens, Philip has us to thank for his prosperity. We have raised him to a greater height than ever king of Macedonia reached before. Today this opportunity comes to us from the Olynthians unsought, a fairer opportunity than we have ever had befo
Demosthenes, Olynthiac 1, section 12 (search)
But if we leave these men too in the lurch, Athenians, and then Olynthus is crushed by Philip, tell me what is to prevent him from marching henceforward just where he pleases. I wonder if any one of you in this audience watches and notes the steps by which Philip, weak at first, has grown so powerful. First he seized Amphipolis, next Pydna, then Potidaea, after that Methone, lastly he invaded Thessaly.
Demosthenes, Olynthiac 2, section 7 (search)
I find that next he won the friendship of the Olynthians by capturing Potidaea, which was yours, and thus wronging you, his former allies,If the Greek is sound, this must allude to Philip's offer of alliance with Athens ten years before. But perhaps we should omit u(ma=s with Blass. The allies will then be the Potidaeans, as the Scholiast explains. in presenting it to them. Lastly he has won over the Thessalians by promising to bestow Magnesia upon them and by undertaking to conduct the Phocian warThe Sacred War of 355-346. in their interests. In a word, he has hoodwinked everyone that has had any dealings with him; he has played upon the folly of each party in turn and exploited their ignorance of his own character. That is how he has gained his
Demosthenes, Olynthiac 2, section 14 (search)
Yes, the power and sovereignty of Macedonia is indeed, as an adjunct, no slight contribution, as you found it when on your side against Olynthus in the days of Timotheus.In 364 an Athenian force under Timotheus joined Perdiccas, king of Macedonia, in an attack on the Olynthian confederacy. On another occasion, in dealing with Potidaea, the Olynthians found its cooperation of some value; and lately it came to the help of the Thessalians in their factions and feuds against the ruling house. The accession, I suppose, even of a small force is in every way helpful; but by itself Macedonia is weak and full of defects.
Demosthenes, Philippic 1, section 4 (search)
But if anyone here, Athenians, is inclined to think Philip too formidable, having regard to the extent of his existing resources and to our loss of all our strongholds, he is indeed right, yet he must reflect that we too, men of Athens, once held Pydna, Potidaea, and Methone and had in our own hands all the surrounding territory, and that many of the native tribes now in his service were then free and independent and were indeed more inclined to side with us than with Philip.
Demosthenes, Philippic 1, section 27 (search)
from among yourselves, native Athenian officers, that the force might be a truly national one? Yes, but your own cavalry-commander has to sail to Lemnos,We learn from Aristot. Ath. Pol. 61.6, that a i(/pparxos was regularly sent to Lemnos to take charge of the cavalry there. leaving MenelausIdentified by Harpocration with a son of Amyntas II. and so half-brother of Philip; more probably a petty Macedonian chief who helped the Athenians at Potidaea in 364, and who is named in a complimentary inscription which has been preserved (C.I.A. 2.55). to command the men who are fighting for our city's possessions. I do not say this in his disparagement, but that commander, whoever he is, ought to be one elected by y
Demosthenes, Philippic 1, section 35 (search)
And yet, men of Athens, how do you account for the fact that the Panathenaic festival and the Dionysia are always held at the right date, whether experts or laymen are chosen by lot to manage them, that larger sums are lavished upon them than upon any one of your expeditions, that they are celebrated with bigger crowds and greater splendor than anything else of the kind in the world, whereas your expeditions invariably arrive too late, whether at Methone or at Pagasae or at Potidaea?
Demosthenes, Philippic 2, section 17 (search)
And today at any rate this policy is in a measure forced upon him. For observe! He wants to rule, and he has made up his mind that you, and you only, are his rivals. He has long injured you; of nothing is he more conscious than of that. For it is by holding the cities which are really yours that he retains safe possession of all the rest, and he feels that if he gave up Amphipolis and Potidaea, his own country would not be safe for him.
Demosthenes, Philippic 2, section 20 (search)
to hear a word said against Philip in the days when he was handing over to them Anthemus, to which all the former kings of Macedonia laid claim, when he was making them a present of Potidaea, expelling the Athenian settlers, and when he had taken upon himself the responsibility of a quarrel with us and had given them the territory of Potidaea for their own use? Do you imagine they expected to themus, to which all the former kings of Macedonia laid claim, when he was making them a present of Potidaea, expelling the Athenian settlers, and when he had taken upon himself the responsibility of a quarrel with us and had given them the territory of Potidaea for their own use? Do you imagine they expected to be treated as they have been, or would have believed anyone who suggested it?
Demosthenes, On the Halonnesus, section 9 (search)
e conditions under which their nationals might mutually obtain legal redress, were calledsu/mbola. The cases were tried in the courts of the defendant's state. The terms of the compact with Macedonia were to be ratified by the heliastic court of Athens, but Philip claimed the right of final ratification. Others explain it to mean that Philip demanded that the verdicts of the Athenian juries in cases under this pact (di/kai a)po\ sumbo/lwn) should be confirmed by him. His object, of course, is to steal a march on you, and to insert in the compact an admission on your part that none of the wrongs committed at Potidaea are charged against him by you as the injured party, but that you confirm his seizure and retention of that city as lawful.
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