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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 86 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 8 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 8 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 6 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Georgics (ed. J. B. Greenough) 6 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham) 6 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 2 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham). You can also browse the collection for Scythia or search for Scythia in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham), Book 3, chapter 3 (search)
The reasonIn the mss. the words ‘The reason why . . . list of causes’ come after ‘But we do not deliberate . . . Scythia.’ why we do not deliberate about these things is that none of them can be effected by our
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham), Book 3, chapter 3 (search)
We deliberate about things that are in our control and are attainable by action (which are in fact the only things that still remain to be considered; for Nature, Necessity, and Chance, with the addition of Intelligence and human agency generally, exhaust the generally accepted list of causes). But we do not deliberate about all human affairs without exception either: for example, no Lacedaemonian deliberates about the best form of governmentOr, ‘the best line of policy.’ for Scythia; but any particular set of men deliberates about the things attainable by their own a
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham), Book 7, chapter 7 (search)
is due to some innate tendency, or to disease: instances of the former being the hereditary effeminacyHdt. 1.105, says that certain Scythians who robbed the temple of Uranian Aphrodite at Askalon were smitten with the ‘feminine disease,’ which affected their descendants ever after; but Hippocrates, *peri\ a)e/rwn22, describes effeminate symptoms prevalent among wealthy and high-born Scythians, due to being too much on horseback. of the royal family of Scythia, and the inferior endurance of the female sex as compared with the male. People too fond of amusement are thought to be profligate, but really they are soft; for amusement is rest, and therefore a slackening of effort, and addiction to amusement is a form of excessive slackness.i.e., it is not an excessive proneness to pursue pleasure, and therefore is not profligacy. But there are two forms of Unrestraint, Impetuousness and Weakness. The weak deliberate,