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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 144 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller) 82 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 24 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 22 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 20 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Persians (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 18 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 18 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 12 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 10 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long). You can also browse the collection for Persia (Iran) or search for Persia (Iran) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 2 (search)
etudo loquitur, id solum dicitur Honestum quod est populari fama gloriosum (e)/ndocon). See Schweig.'s note. It was through this ignorance that the Athenians and the Lacedaemonians quarrelled, and the Thebans with both; and the great king quarrelled with Hellas, and the Macedonians with both; and the Romans with the Getae.The quarrels of the Athenians with the Lacedaemonians appear chiefly in the history of the Peloponnesian war. (Thucydides, i. 1). The quarrel of the great king, the king of Persia, is the subject of the history of Herodotus (i. 1). The great quarrel of the Macedonians with the Persians is the subject of Arrian's expedition of Alexander. The Romans were at war with the Getae or Daci in the time of Trajan, and we may assume that Epictetus was still living then. And still earlier the Trojan war happened for these reasons. Alexander was the guest of Menelaus; and if any man had seen their friendly disposition, he would not have believed any one who said that they were not
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 3 (search)
re treating him unworthily, a man who gloried in his circumstances, and claimed to be an example to those who were passing by? For what shall he accuse him of? because he maintains a decency of behaviour, because he displays his virtue more conspicuously?I have not translated, because I do not understand, the words dti kathgorei=. See Schweig.'s note. Well, and what does he say of poverty, about death, about pain? How did he compare his own happiness with that of the great king (the king of Persia)? or rather he thought that there was no comparison between them. For where there are perturbations, and griefs, and fears, and desires not satisfied, and aversions of things which you cannot avoid, and envies and jealousies, how is there a road to happiness there? But where there are corrupt principles, there these things must of necessity be. When the young man asked, if when a Cynic has fallen sick, and a friend asks him to come to his house and to be take care of in his sickness, shall t