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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 144 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller) 82 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 24 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 22 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 20 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 18 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Persians (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 18 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 12 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 10 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington). You can also browse the collection for Persia (Iran) or search for Persia (Iran) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington), Book 1, Poem 21 (search)
Of Dian's praises, tender maidens, tell; Of Cynthus' unshorn god, young striplings, sing; And bright Latona, well Beloved of Heaven's high king. Sing her that streams and silvan foliage loves, Whate'er on Algidus' chill brow is seen, In Erymanthian groves Dark-leaved, or Cragus green. Sing Tempe too, glad youths, in strain as loud, And Phoebus' birthplace, and that shoulder fair, His golden quiver proud And brother's lyre to bear. His arm shall banish Hunger, Plague, and War To Persia and to Britain's coast, away From Rome and Caesar far, If you have zeal to pray.
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington), Book 4, Poem 15 (search)
tored To squalid fields the plenteous grain, Given back to Rome's almighty Lord Our standards, torn from Parthian fane, Has closed Quirinian Janus' gate, Wild passion's erring walk controll'd, Heal'd the foul plague-spot of the state, And brought again the life of old, Life, by whose healthful power increased The glorious name of Latium spread To where the sun illumes the east From where he seeks his western bed. While Caesar rules, no civil strife Shall break our rest, nor violence rude, Nor rage, that whets the slaughtering knife And plunges wretched towns in feud. The sons of Danube shall not scorn The Julian edicts; no, nor they By Tanais' distant river horn, Nor Persia, Scythia, or Cathay. And we on feast and working-tide, While Bacchus' bounties freely flow, Our wives and children at our side, First paying Heaven the prayers we owe, Shall sing of chiefs whose deeds are done, As wont our sires, to flute or shell, And Troy, Anchises, and the son Of Venus on our tongues shall dwell.