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Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 90 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 39 9 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 32 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 22 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 22 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 20 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 12 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 12 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 10 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Russell Lowell, Among my books. You can also browse the collection for Florence (Italy) or search for Florence (Italy) in all documents.

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James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Dante. (search)
e guides in a writer so scrupulous and exact) imply irresistibly that Dante had become a party by himself before his exile. The measure adopted by the Priors of Florence while he was one of them (with his assent and probably by his counsel), of sending to the frontier the leading men of both factions, confirms this implication. iotic, as it certainly was disinterested. We whose country is the world, as the ocean to the fish, he tells us, though we drank of the Arno in infancy, and love Florence so much that, because we loved her, we suffer exile unjustly, support the shoulders of our judgment rather upon reason than the senses. De Vulgari Eloquio, Liot come to her is not wonderful, for he would have been burned alive if he had. Dante could not send for her because he was a homeless wanderer. She remained in Florence with her children because she had powerful relations and perhaps property there. It is plain, also, that what Boccaccio says of Dante's lussuria had no better f