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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 70 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 42 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 16 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 14 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 12 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Pythian 4 (ed. Steven J. Willett) 10 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 8 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 6 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Politics. You can also browse the collection for Cyrene (Libya) or search for Cyrene (Libya) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Aristotle, Politics, Book 3, section 1285b (search)
p the sceptre.This ritual is mentioned in Hom. Il. 1.234, Hom. Il. 7.412, Hom. Il. 10.328. These kings then of ancient times used to govern continuously in matters within the city and in the country and across the frontiers; but later on when gradually the kings relinquished some of their powers and had others taken from them by the multitudes, in the cities in general only the sacrifices were left to the kings,The monarchy was reduced to a priesthood at Cyrene (Hdt. 4.161) and at Ephesus. while where anything that deserves the name of royalty survived the kings only had the command in military expeditions across the frontiers. There are then these kinds of kingship, four in number: one belonging to the heroic times, which was exercised over willing subjects, but in certain limited fields, for the king was general and judge and master of religious ceremonies; second, the barbarian monarchy, which is an hereditar
Aristotle, Politics, Book 6, section 1319b (search)
d that point; for if they exceed it they make the government more disorderly, and also provoke the notables further in the direction of being reluctant to endure the democracy, which actually took place and caused the revolution at CyreneIn N. Africa. Diodorus (Diod. 14.34) describes a revolution there in 401 B.C., when five hundred of the rich were put to death and others fled, but after a battle a compromise was arranged.; for a small base element is democracy of this kind will also find useful such institutions as were employed by CleisthenesSee 1275b 36 n. at Athens when he wished to increase the power of the democracy, and by the party setting up the democracy at Cyrene; different tribes and brotherhoods must be created outnumbering the old ones, and the celebrations of private religious rites must be grouped together into a small number of public celebrations, and every device must be employed to