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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 70 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 42 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 16 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 14 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 12 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Pythian 4 (ed. Steven J. Willett) 10 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 8 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 6 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 6 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge). You can also browse the collection for Cyrene (Libya) or search for Cyrene (Libya) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

M. Tullius Cicero, For Plancius (ed. C. D. Yonge), chapter 5 (search)
ay Caius Seranus a most foolish man, for nevertheless he was a noble; nor Caius Fimbria, a new man, for he was a magnanimous man and a wise counselor; but Cnaeus Mallius, a man not only of no rank or family at all, but utterly destitute of virtue and ability, and of contemptible and sordid habits of life. —“My eyes,” says the people, “looked in vain for you when you were at Cyrene; for I should have preferred reaping the benefit of your virtue myself to letting your companions have it all to themselves; and the more it was an object to me to do so, the more did you keep aloof from me. At all events, I did not see you. Then you deserted and abandoned me, though thirsting for your virtue; for you had begun to offer yourself as a candidate for the
M. Tullius Cicero, For Plancius (ed. C. D. Yonge), chapter 26 (search)
nce can admit without any danger. And I do not only admit that every sort of high quality is to be found in Laterensis, but I even find fault with you, for not enumerating his chief excellences, but descending to look for trifling and insignificant subjects for panegyric. You say “That he celebrated games at Praeneste.” Well; have not other quaestors done the same? “That at Cyrene he was liberal towards the farmers of the revenue, and just towards the allies.” Who denies it? but so many important transactions take place at Rome, that it is difficult for those things which are done in the provinces to get heard of. I have no fear, O judges, of appearing to assume too much credit to myself, if I speak of my own quaestorship. For although I got great