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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.21 (search)
1870-94 (Milne's Romance of a Proconsul). Referring to Sir George Grey's masterly despatches, with their singularly clear and definite analysis of the conditions of South Africa, Basil Worsfold (History of South Africa, in Dent's Temple Series) says, In so far as any one cause can be assigned for the subsequent disasters, both military and administrative, of the British Government in South Africa, it is to be found in the unwillingness of the man in Downing Street to listen to the man at Cape Town. Part II. private reflections The foregoing pages are compiled partly from unpublished papers of Stanley's, and partly from his private Journals. Some further passages may here be given from private note-books, written in his leisure. The writing was evidently prompted by an impulse of self-defense; partly, with regard to Emin, whose real name was Edouard Schnitzer, and, partly, as the result of strictures on his own character as a commander, in the published Journals of some of
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.23 (search)
anticipated by Stanley, and rendered feasible by this Treaty, was lost to England owing to the weakness of the Liberal Government of the day, who were actually bluffed into cancelling the Treaty by German pressure. with all powers of jurisdiction. Sir William Mackinnon and myself were the signatories duly empowered. See In Darkest Africa, vol. II. In my opinion, the advantages of this Treaty were on the side of the British, as there was now a free broad line of communications between Cape Town and British Equatoria, while my own secret hopes of the future of the Ruwenzori range were more likely to be gratified by its acquisition by the English, because, once the railway reached within a reasonable distance of the Snowy Mountains, a certain beautiful plateau — commanding a view of the snow-peaks, the plain of Usongora, the Lake Albert Edward, and the Semliki Valley — must become the site of the future Simla of Africa. On the other hand, the King was pleased with the extension of