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Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 6 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 4 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 2 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson). You can also browse the collection for Corsica (France) or search for Corsica (France) in all documents.

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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Augustus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 63 (search)
ty, all the reply he gave was: "I wish you had all such daughters and wives as she is." He likewise forbad a child, of which his granddaughter Julia was delivered after sentence had passed against her, to be either owned as a relation, or brought up. Agrippa, who was equally intractable, and whose folly increased every day, he transported to an island,Agrippa was first banished to the little desolate island of Planasia, now Pianosa. It is one of the group in the Tuscan sea, between Elba and Corsica. and placed a guard of soldiers about him; procuring at the same time an act of the senate for his confinement there during life. Upon any mention of him and the two Julias, he would say, with a heavy sigh, Would I were wifeless, or had childless died!A quotation from the Iliad, iii. 40; where Hector is venting his rage on Paris. The inflexion is slightly changed, the line in the original commencing, ai(/q' o)/feles, "would thou wert, etc." nor did he usually call them by any other name t
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Nero (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 7 (search)
When he was yet a mere boy, before he arrived at the age of puberty, during the celebration of the Circensian Games,A.U.C. 806 he performed his part in the Trojan play with a degree of firmness which gained him great applause. In the eleventh year of his age, he was adopted by Claudius, and placed under the tuition of Anneus Seneca, Seneca. the celebrated philosophical writer. had been released from exile in Corsica, shortly before the death of Tiberius. He afterwards fell a sacrifice to the jealousy and cruelty of his former pupil, Nero. who had been made a senator. It is said, that Seneca dreamt the night after, that he was giving a lesson to Caius Caesar.Caligula Nero soon verified his dream, betraying the cruelty of his disposition in every way he could. For he attempted to persuade his father that his brother, Britannicus, was nothing but a changeling, because the latter had saluted him, notwithstanding his adoption, by the name of ,Enobarbus, as usual. When his aunt, Lepida,
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Vespasianus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 1 (search)
tum, a place on the summit of a hill, called Vespasize, where are several monuments of the Vespasii, a sufficient proof of the splendour and antiquity of the family. I will not deny that some have pretended to say. that Petro's father was a native of Gallia Transpadana, Gaul beyond, north of, the Po, now Lombardy. whose employment was to hire work-people who used to emigrate every year from the country of the Umbria into that of the Sabines, to assist them in their husbandry; We find the annual migration of labourers in husbandry a very common practice in ancient as well as in modern times. At present, several thousand industrious labourers cross over every summer from the duchies of Parma and Modena, bordering on the district mentioned by Suetonius, to the island of Corsica; returning to the continent when the harvest is got in. but who settled at last in the town of Reate, and there married. But of this I have not been able to discover the least proof, upon the strictest inquiry.