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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 14 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 18 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 14 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 14 0 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 12 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 8 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 8 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 8 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 8 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Dublin (Irish Republic) or search for Dublin (Irish Republic) in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
ical business talent, and unfailing grasp of principles. She was the Mrs. Chapman of the British agitation. What mistakes people make! They think Victoria Queen of England, when it is Elizabeth Pease; and know not that the Allens and Webbs [of Dublin] are the Lords Spiritual and Temporal (Ms. Jan. 30, 1841, E. Quincy to Collins). What more of royalty has England's queen? asked Mr. Garrison in his sonnet to Elizabeth Pease (Lib. 12.4). Colver was efficiently seconded by Torrey, temporariw up its annual report, and bore the expenses of its single (annual) meeting and of its short-lived organ, the Ante, 2.386; Lib. 11.137, 167, 193. (monthly) Anti-Slavery Reporter, which Whittier helped edit. Mrs. Mott writes to Hannah Webb of Dublin, Feb. 25, 1842 (Ms.): Maria W. Chapman wrote me that he [Whittier] . . . was in the [A. S.] office a few months since, bemoaning to Garrison that there should have been any divisions. Why could we not all go on together? Why not, indeed? said
g's works on his table—excellent aids (we will add) to Kossuth's theological development, but not calculated to make him shun the society or applause of slaveholders. Save him! save him! wrote Henry C. Wright to James Haughton Lib. 21.179. of Dublin. Tell him of American slavery. He is lost —lost to himself and the friends and cause of liberty in all coming time—if he lands on this slavery-cursed shore. here lies Kossuth—the American slaveholder —must be his epitaph if he touches our shlition party (quoted in Ms. June 7, 1852, S. May, Jr., to W. L. G.). See the vindicatory pamphlet, Statements respecting the American Abolitionists, by their Opponents and their Friends, published by the Bristol and Clifton Ladies' A. S. Society (Dublin: Webb & Chapman, 1852). A year before, Mr. McKim, in writing to Mr. Garrison Ms. Oct. 25, 1851. on another topic, asked if the rumor were true that he believed in the spiritual origin of the so-called Rochester knockings. The first publi