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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 80 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 21 1 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 13 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 10 10 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Algiers (Algeria) or search for Algiers (Algeria) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
aze, and our ingenuity was much taxed to avoid the floating conflagration. I neglected to mention my having good information respecting the iron-clad rams which they were building. I sent Captain Lee up to seize the principal one, the Mississippi, which was to be the terror of these seas, and no doubt would have been to a great extent; but she came floating by us all in flames, and passed down the river. Another was sunk immediately in front of the custom house; others were building in Algiers, just begun. I next went above the city eight miles, to Carrolton, where I learned there were two other forts, but the panic had gone before me. I found the guns spiked, and the guncarriages in flames. The first work, on the right reaches from the Mississippi nearly over to Pontchartrain, and has 29 guns: the one on the left had six guns, from which Commander Lee took some fifty barrels of powder, and completed the destruction of the gun-carriages, etc. A mile higher up there were two o
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
ap upon the heads of those on board the ships; it was as if bedlam had broken loose and all its inmates were assembled on the levee at New Orleans. Farragut at once ordered the seizure of a large ram which was intended to be a very formidable vessel, but was still unfinished. Before the officer who had been sent to take possession could reach the ram she came floating down the river enveloped in flames. Another was sunk right opposite the Custom House. Others, which were just begun at Algiers, on the opposite side of the river from New Orleans, were burning. Truly, the Queen city of the South was doing her share in building rams to annihilate our Navy and Commerce, but where were our rams that should have been built by the North which boasted of its great skill and resources? These should have been ready to sally out within three months after the war began, to drive the Louisiana, Manassas, Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas, Albemarle, and others, back to their holes or crush