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Epictetus, Works (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson) 26 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 16 0 Browse Search
Plato, Republic 16 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 12 0 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 41-50 6 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 6 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Asinaria, or The Ass-Dealer (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 4 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 4 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese). You can also browse the collection for Athens (Greece) or search for Athens (Greece) in all documents.

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Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese), book 2, chapter 23 (search)
n the passage in Aristot. Top. 1.15). A suggested reading is peri\ tou/tou o)rqw=s ei)/rhtai. Another, from division. For example, “There are always three motives for wrongdoing; two are excluded from consideration as impossible; as for the third, not even the accusers assert it.” Another, from induction. For instance, from the case of the woman of Peparethus, it is argued that in matters of parentage women always discern the truth; similarly, at Athens, when Mantias the orator was litigating with his son, the mother declared the truth;Mantias had one legitimate son Mantitheus and two illegitimate by a certain Plangon. Mantias at first refused to acknowledge the latter as his sons, until the mother declared they were. and again, at Thebes, when Ismenias and Stilbon were disputing about a child, DodonisThe name of the mother; or simply, “the woman of Dodona,” like “the woman of Peparethus.” decl