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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 106 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 74 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 74 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 42 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 36 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 34 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 28 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 26 0 Browse Search
Plato, Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Phaedo 14 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs). You can also browse the collection for Thessaly (Greece) or search for Thessaly (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 1 (search)
s children. In days gone by I was a woman to be envied, but now I am, if any woman ever was, the paragon of misery. I saw my husband Hector killed by the hand of Achilles and I beheld Astyanax, the son I bore my husband, hurled from the high battlements once the Greeks had captured the land of Troy. I myself, a member of a house most free, became a slave and was brought to Greece, given as the choicest of the Trojan spoil to the islander Neoptolemus as his prize of war. I live now in the lands that border on Phthia here and the city of Pharsalia, lands where the sea-goddess Thetis, far from the haunts of men and fleeing their company, dwelt as wife with Peleus. The people of Thessaly call it Thetideion in honor of the goddess's marriage. Here is where Achilles' son made his home, and he lets Peleus rule over the land of Pharsalia, being unwilling to take the sceptre during the old man's lifetime. In this house I have given birth to a manchild, lying with Achilles' son, my master.
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 1173 (search)
Peleus Ah me, what disaster is this I see and take in my hands into my house! Oh, alas! City of Thessaly, I am undone, I am perished, none of my race, no children, are left for me in my house! Oh how wretched misfortune has made me! To what friend shall I look for consolation? O face that I love and knees and hands, would that the god had killed you beneath Troy's walls by the bank of the Simois!