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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 106 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 74 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 74 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 42 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 36 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 34 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 28 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 26 0 Browse Search
Plato, Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Phaedo 14 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More). You can also browse the collection for Thessaly (Greece) or search for Thessaly (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), BOOK 1, line 567 (search)
There is a grove in Thessaly, enclosed on every side with crags, precipitous,— on which a forest grows—and this is called the Vale of Tempe—through this valley flows the River Peneus, white with foaming waves, that issue from the foot of Pindus, whence with sudden fall up gather steamy clouds that sprinkle mist upon the circling trees, and far away with mighty roar resound. It is the abode, the solitary home, that mighty River loves, where deep in gloom of rocky cavern, he resides and rules the flowing waters and the water nymphs abiding there. All rivers of that land now hasten thither, doubtful to console or flatter Daphne's parent: poplar crowned Sperchios, swift Enipeus and the wild Amphrysos, old Apidanus and Aeas, with all their kindred streams that wandering maze and wearied seek the ocean. Inachus alone is absent, hidden in his cave obscure, deepening his waters with his tears— most wretchedly bewailing, for he deems his daughter Io lost. If she may live or roam a spirit
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 2, line 531 (search)
nd conscious of her crime conceals her shame in the dark night—Minerva's Owl now called. All the glad birds of day, indignant shun, and chase her from the skies.” But now replied the Raven to the Crow, that talked so much, “A mischief fall upon your prating head for this detention of my flight. Your words and warnings I despise.” With which retort he winged upon his journey, swiftly thence in haste, despite the warning to inform his patron, Phoebus, how he saw the fair Coronis with a lad of Thessaly. And when Apollo, Phoebus, heard the tale the busy Raven made such haste to tell, he dropped his plectrum and his laurel wreath, and his bright countenance went white with rage. He seized his trusted arms, and having bent his certain bow, pierced with a deadly shaft that bosom which so often he had pressed against his own. Coronis moaned in pain,— and as she drew the keen shaft from the wound, her snow-white limbs were bathed in purple blood: and thus she wailed, “Ah, Phoebus! punishme
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 7, line 159 (search)
Now when the valiant Argonauts returned to Thessaly, their happy relatives, fathers and mothers, praised the living Gods; and with their hallowed gifts enhanced the flames with precious incense; and they offered Jove a sacred bullock, rich with gilded horns. But Jason's father, Aeson, came not down rejoicing to behold his son, for now worn out with many years, he waited death. And Jason to Medea grieving said: “Dearest, to whom my life and love are due, although your kindness has been great ariot down.” A chariot, sent from heaven, came to her— and soon as she had stroked the dragons' necks, and shaken in her hands the guiding reins— as soon as she had mounted, she was borne quickly above, through unresisting air. And, sailing over Thessaly, she saw the vale of Tempe, where the level soil is widely covered with a crumbling chalk— she turned her dragons towards new regions there: and she observed the herbs by Ossa born, the weeds on lofty Pelion, Othrys, Pindus and vast Olympus
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 8, line 799 (search)
breast was flat against her spine; her lean, emaciated body made her joints appear so large, her knobbled knees seemed large knots, and her swollen ankle-bones protruded. When the Nymph, with keen sight, saw the Famine-monster, fearing to draw near she cried aloud the mandate she had brought from fruitful Ceres, and although the time had been but brief, and Famine far away, such hunger seized the Nymph, she had to turn her dragon-steeds, and flee through yielding air and the high clouds;—at Thessaly she stopped. Grim Famine hastened to obey the will of Ceres, though their deeds are opposite, and rapidly through ether heights was borne to Erysichthon's home. When she arrived at midnight, slumber was upon the wretch, and as she folded him in her two wings, she breathed her pestilential poison through his mouth and throat and breast, and spread the curse of utmost hunger in his aching veins. When all was done as Ceres had decreed, she left the fertile world for bleak abodes, and her accus
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 12, line 146 (search)
to them: “During your time, Cygnus has been the only man you knew who could despise all weapons and whose flesh could not be pierced by thrust of sword or spear. But long ago I saw another man able to bear unharmed a thousand strokes, Caeneus of Thessaly, Caeneus who lived upon Mt. Othrys. He was famed in war yet, strange to say, by birth he was a woman!” Then all expressed the greatest wonderment, and begged to hear the story of his life. Achilles cried, “O eloquent old man! The wisdom of our auch an injury again. Grant I may be no longer woman, and I'll ask no more.’ while she was speaking to him, the last words of her strange prayer were uttered in so deep, in such a manly tone, it seemed indeed they must be from a man.—That was a fact: Neptune not only had allowed her prayer but made the new man proof against all wounds of spear or sword. Rejoicing in the gift he went his way as Caeneus Atracides, spent years in every manful exercise, and roamed the plains of northern Thessaly