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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 22 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 20 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller) 14 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Minor Works (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.) 12 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Curculio, or The Forgery (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 12 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 12 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 10 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 6 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller). You can also browse the collection for Caria (Turkey) or search for Caria (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 1, chapter 1 (search)
ians, the Illyrian with his Illyrians, and so also all other nations, we are told. Those in Europe, at any rate, are said to be free and independent of one another even to this day. But Cyrus, finding the nations in Asia also independent in exactly the same way, started out with a little band of Persians and became the leader of the Medes by their full consent and of the HyrcaniansThe extent of his kingdom by theirs; he then conquered Syria, Assyria, Arabia, Cappadocia, both Phrygias, Lydia, Caria, Phoenicia, and Babylonia; he ruled also over Bactria, India, and Cilicia; and he was likewise king of the Sacians, Paphlagonians, Magadidae, and very many other nations, of which one could not even tell the names; he brought under his sway the Asiatic Greeks also; and, descending to the sea, he added both Cyprus and Egypt to his empire. He ruled over these nations, even though theyThe secret of his power did not speak the same language as he, nor one nation the same as another; for all that
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 1, chapter 5 (search)
ry large nation, and had made the king of Arabia his vassal; he already had Hyrcania under his dominion and was closely besetting Bactria. So he thought that if he should break the power of the Medes, he should easily obtain dominion over all the nations round about; for he considered the Medes the strongest of the neighbouring tribes. Accordingly, he sent around to all those under his sway and to Croesus, the king of Lydia, to the king of Cappadocia; to both Phrygias, to Paphlagonia, India, Caria, and Cilicia; and to a certain extent also he misrepresented the Medes and Persians, for he said that they were great, powerful nations, that they had intermarried with each other, and were united in common interests, and that unless some one attacked them first and broke their power, they would be likely to make war upon each one of the nations singly and subjugate them. Some, then, entered into an alliance with him because they actually believed what he said; others, because they were brib
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 4, chapter 5 (search)
they proceeded to the division ofThe spoils are divided the spoil, laughing heartily at his joke about the Persian horsemanship, while he called his captains and ordered them to take the horses and the grooms and the trappings of the horses, and to count them off and divide them by lot so that they should each have an equal share for each company. And again Cyrus ordered proclamation to beCyrus finds squires for his Persians made that if there were any one from Media or Persia or Bactria or Caria or Greece or anywhere else forced into service as a slave in the army of the Assyrians or Syrians or Arabians, he should show himself. And when they heard the herald's proclamation, many came forward gladly. And he selected the finest looking of them and told them that they should be made free, but that they would have to act as carriers of any arms given them to carry; and for their sustenance he himself, he said, would make provision. And so he led them at once to his captains and presente
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 7, chapter 4 (search)
Then the Carians fell into strife and civil warAdusius settles a civil war in Caria with one another; they were intrenched in strongholds, and both sides called upon Cyrus for assistance. So while Cyrus himself stayed in Sardis to make siege-engines and battering rams to demolish the walls of such as should refuse to submit, he entan army to Adusius, a Persian who was not lacking in judgment generally and not unskilled in war, and who was besides a very courteous gentleman, and sent him into Caria; and the Cilicians and Cyprians also joined most heartily in this expedition. Because of their enthusiastic allegiance he never sent a Persian satrap to govern eittheir native princes. Tribute, however, he did receive from them, and whenever he needed forces he made a requisition upon them for troops. Adusius now set out for Caria at the head of his army; and there came to him representatives from both parties of the Carians, ready to receive him into their walls to the injury of the rival f
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 8, chapter 6 (search)
o more than fair; for if any danger threatens anywhere, it is we who shall have to ward it off.” With these words he concluded his address onCyrus appoints the satraps that occasion; and then he chose out from the number of his friends those whom he saw eager to go on the conditions named and who seemed to him best qualified, and sent them as satraps to the following countries: Megabyzus to Arabia, Artabatas to Cappadocia, Artacamas to Phrygia Major, Chrysantas to Lydia and Ionia, Adusius to Caria (it was he for whom the Carians had petitioned), and Pharnuchus to Aeolia and Phrygia on the Hellespont. He sent out no Persians as satraps over Cilicia or Cyprus or Paphlagonia, because these he thought joined his expedition against Babylon voluntarily; he did, however, require even these nations to pay tribute. As Cyrus then organized the service, so is it even to this day: the garrisons upon the citadels are immediately under the king's control, and the colonels in command of the garrison