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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.5 (search)
Chapter I the Workhouse it is said that one of the patrician Mostyns, of North Wales, possesses a written pedigree forty feet long, to prove the claim of his family to a direct descent from Adam. Though no doubt much of this extraordinary genealogy is fabulous, it allows all of us plebeians a reasonable hope to believe that ugh his charity I had learned to know God by faith, as the Father of the fatherless, and I had been taught to read. It is impossible that in a Christian land like Wales I could have avoided contracting some knowledge of the Creator, but the knowledge which is gained by hearing is very different from that which comes from feeling. my life. But for the stupid and brutal scene which brought it about, I might eventually have been apprenticed to some trade or another, and would have mildewed in Wales, because, with some knowledge of my disposition, I require great cause to break away from associations. Unknown to myself, and unperceived by anyone else, I had a
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.6 (search)
y last chance. If he refused his aid, my fate must necessarily be that of a young vagabond, for Wales is a poor country for the homeless and friendless. I was admitted by a buxom woman of decideding of blind love. As the little packet-steamer bore us towards Liverpool, and the shores of Wales receded from view, the sight of the melancholy sea and cold sky seemed in fit sympathy with the . My word, laddy! thou art a fine boy! Why, I had no idea they could raise such as thou in Wales. What hast been living on to get so plump and round — cheeks like apples, and eyes like stars? ie, and the like; but Uncle Tom was hugely delighted, and took it all as a matter of course. In Wales, however, married people did not conduct themselves so grossly in public. When we rose to go t mind that my humiliation was in excess. I had not obtained the clerkship for which I had left Wales, my gold sovereign was gone, all my clothes were in the pawnshop. I had fallen so low as to bec
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.9 (search)
utter stranger, such as tooth-and nail-brushes, and long white shirts, resembling girls' frocks, for night-dresses. It had never entered my head, before, that teeth should be brushed, or that a nail-brush was indispensable, or that a night-dress contributed to health and comfort! When we returned to Mr. Stanley's boarding-house, we had a pleasant time in the arrangement of the piles of new garments and accessories, and in practising the first lessons in the art of personal decoration. In Wales the inhabitants considered it unbecoming in one who aspired to manliness to ape the finicky niceties of women, and to be too regardful of one's personal appearance; and had they heard my new father descant so learnedly on the uses of tooth-and nail-brushes, I feel sure they would have turned away with grimaces and shrugs of dissatisfaction. What would stern Aunt Mary have said, had she viewed this store of clothing and linen that was destined for the use of a boy whom, at one time, she had
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.10 (search)
f the comfortable homeliness of Mr. Waring's house gave me an impression of family felicity, and when the old man with several smiling members of his family came to the door, it appeared to me as if it revived a picture I had seen some — where in Wales, and all my heart went out to those who were in the house. Strange to say, in proportion to the period spent at Major Ingham's, I possess a more vivid recollection of the night I passed at Mr. Waring's, and my thoughts have more often reverted belonging to free whites, but reserved to themselves the right to behave as they deemed fitting to their state, and of airing any peculiarity unquestioned, and unremarked by the commonalty. They were as exclusive as the proud county families of Wales. It may easily be seen, then, what a sight our store presented when about a dozen magnates of this kind, fresh from their cotton principalities, and armed, cap-à--pie, each in his own peculiar dress, assembled in it. In time, of course, I beca
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.13 (search)
punished until he repented. But it was useless to try and influence me by political reasons. In the first place, I was too ignorant in politics, and too slow of comprehension, to follow his reasonings; in the second place, every American friend of mine was a Southerner, and my adopted father was a Southerner, and I was blind through my gratitude; and, in the third place, I had a secret scorn for people who could kill one another for the sake of African slaves. There were no blackies in Wales, and why a sooty-faced nigger from a distant land should be an element of disturbance between white brothers, was a puzzle to me. I should have to read a great deal about him, ascertain his wrongs and his rights, and wherein his enslavement was unjust and his liberty was desirable, before I could venture upon giving an opinion adverse to 20,000,000 Southerners. As I had seen him in the South, he was a half-savage, who had been exported by his own countrymen, and sold in open market, agreeab
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.24 (search)
, romping school-boys, fond mamas, and a score of other things--one can get from the Suspension Bridge! His next letter was from Clifton:-- You press me to accept the invitation to preside at the Eisteddfod. I feel that we, the people of Wales generally, and I, are not in such close sympathy as to enable me to say anything sufficiently pleasing to their ears. How could it be otherwise? The Eisteddfod, as I understand it, is for the purpose of exciting interest in the Welsh nationalitrd shift I am put? I shall be hooted out of the country, because my stubborn tongue cannot frame agreeable fictions! June 16, 1891, he wrote to me:-- You ought to have been with me at Carnarvon, simply to be amazed at the excitement in North Wales, along the line, as I stepped from the train; the people, hard-featured, homely creatures, rushed up, the crowd being enormous. Yesterday I had a striking explanation of why and wherefore the woman in the Scriptures kissed the hem of the Mast
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.25 (search)
en-party at Marlborough House. I generally dislike these mobs of people; but I met several interesting characters here, and, of course, the Prince and Princess of Wales were, as usual, charming. July 13th. Glanced over Burton's Life — it is written by his wife. It is very interesting, but the real Burton is not to be found inaker, as a hunter, carried his hunting into unknown parts, and distinguished himself by his discovery of the Albert Nyanza, and by his adventures. The Prince of Wales became interested in him, and through the influence of the Prince, he was appointed Egyptian proconsul of the Upper Nile regions at a munificent salary. Baker wasMachiavellian, and are bound to be! The following passage is taken from the Journal:-- October 29th, 1894. D. and I left London for Dolaucothy, Llanwrda, S. Wales, to spend three days with Sir James and Lady Hills-Johnes. Lieutenant-general Sir James Hills-Johnes, G. C. B., V. C., who was dangerously wounded in the Indi
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.31 (search)
havens. Yet I sympathise still with that belief of my youth, that Wales, being my native-land, possessed for me superior charms to any othepathise, it is probable that I should have retained the belief that Wales was the finest country in the world, and the Welsh people the best. make in the feeling between employers and employees! The cry of Wales for the Welsh During my residence in Wales every English man orWales every English man or woman I saw has left in my memory an amiable reminder. The Bishop was an Englishman. Captain Thomas, the paternal, fair-minded, hospitable to say that the Welsh are the first people under the sun, and that Wales is the most beautiful country in the world. But, I am quite willt they might surpass the majority of people if they tried, and that Wales contains within its limited area as beautiful scenes as any. The re the progress of the age, and follow the precepts of the seers. Wales for the Welsh is as senseless as Ireland for the Irish. A common f
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
-525; on learning, 525; on real recreation, 525, 526; on reviews and reviewers, 526, 527; on reading the newspapers, 527; on returning to England, 528; on the England of forty years ago, 529, 530; on socialism, 530; on loafers, 530; on the cry of Wales for the Welsh, 530, 531; on starting on an expedition, 532; on the pleasures of travelling in Africa, 532-535; on returning from an expedition, 535; on the government of the Congo, 536; on the value of the Congo and British East Africa, 536; on G Valencia, Stanley at, 243. Vasari, his Machiavelli, 463. Venezuela, and President Cleveland's message, 482. Victoria, Queen, receives Stanley, 289-291. Victoria Nyanza, the, 305-317, 319. Vivi, 335. Waldron, Mr., 151, 153. Wales for the Welsh, on the cry of, 530, 531. Waring, Mr., 150. Washita River, 146. Waters, Mr., 71, 77, 79, 80. Webb, Mrs., 464. Wellcome, Henry, 514, 515. Welsh language, Stanley's views of, 430. Wilkes, W. H., 206. Williams, Mrs., 92.