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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6,437 1 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 1,858 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 766 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 310 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 302 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 300 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 266 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 224 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 222 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 214 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 25, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for England (United Kingdom) or search for England (United Kingdom) in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: November 25, 1861., [Electronic resource], Letter from George N. Saunders to Louis Kossuth. (search)
o assume the war debt, now about one hundred millions of dollars, thus removing every shackle on commerce and establishing a solute free trade. Commercial freedom would secure basting peace, and insure the highest state of civilization to as generous and chivalric a people as the world possesses. The nations having trade with us will be less taxed by assuming their proportion of our war indebtedness, than they would be by any tariff on imports that could be devised by us. For instance, Great Britain or France, by paying two, or at most three hundred thousand pounds per annum, would be entitled to unrestricted trade with the Confederate States, and their own tariff or revenue laws need not be in anywise deranged. To place the same amount of money in our treasury by any tariff on imports that we might impose would require a very large percentage to be added in consequence of our extensive frontier, inland and coastwise. Direct taxation can be relied on as all-sufficient for the ordi