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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6,437 1 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 1,858 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 766 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 310 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 302 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 300 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 266 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 224 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 222 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 214 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 16, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for England (United Kingdom) or search for England (United Kingdom) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

arrived. The obscurity of the text of the declaration which Mr. Thouvenel submits to us is sufficiently relieved by his verbal explanations.--According to your report of the conversation, before referred to, he said that both France and Great Britain had already announced that they would take no part in our domestic controversy, and they thought a frank and open declaration in advance of the execution of the projected convention might save difficulty and misconception hereafter. He furthsist upon making such contemporaneous declarations as they proposed. These remarks of Mr. Thouvenel are certainly distinguished by entire frankness. It shall be my effort to reply to them with moderation and candor. In 1856 France, Great Britain, Russia, Prussia, Sardinia, and Turkey, being assembled in Congress at Paris, with a view to modify the law of nations so as to meliorate the evils of maritime war, adopted and set forth a declaration, which is in the following words:--
international law to which I had access, viz: Kent Wheaton, Vattel, besides various decisions of Sir William Scott, and other judges of the Admiralty Court of Great Britain, which bore upon the rights of neutrals and their responsibilities. The Governments of Great Britain, France and Spain have issued proclamations that the Great Britain, France and Spain have issued proclamations that the Confederate States were viewed, considered, and treated as belligerents, and knowing that the ports of Great Britain, France, Spain, and Holland, in the West Indies, were open to their vessels, and that they were admitted to all the courtesies and protection vessels of the United States receive, every aid and attention being given Great Britain, France, Spain, and Holland, in the West Indies, were open to their vessels, and that they were admitted to all the courtesies and protection vessels of the United States receive, every aid and attention being given them, proved clearly that they acted upon this view and decision, and brought them within the international law of search and under the responsibilities. I therefore felt no hesitation in boarding and searching all vessels of whatever nation I fell in with, and have done so. The question arose in my mind whether I had the rig
The Daily Dispatch: December 16, 1861., [Electronic resource], Federal relations with foreign Powers. (search)
The partitioning of Virginia. --When the Emperor Leopold was on a visit to his Italian dominions, in the year 1791, he had an interview with Lord Elgin, envoy from the younger Pitt, at that time Premier of Great Britain, and M. Bischofswerder, envoy of the King of Prussia, the object of which was to concert a plan for the dismemberment of France, then agitated by the throes of that mighty Revolution which threw down all the old landmarks of nations, and shook Europe from its centre to its circumference, as though it had been smitten by an earthquake. In conformity with the views expressed at that interview, it was asserted at the time, and was no doubt true, that the Emperor of Germany and the King of Prussia, at an interview held at Pilnitz a few months after, (July, 1792,) actually signed a treaty to the effect indicated. In pursuance of this treaty, the Duke of Brunswick and the King of Prussia entered France with an army of 110,000 men within less than a mouth after; and t