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T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 38 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 36 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 24 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 18 0 Browse Search
Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 12 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Bacchides, or The Twin Sisters (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 12 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 10 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 8 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 6 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Strabo, Geography. You can also browse the collection for Ephesus (Turkey) or search for Ephesus (Turkey) in all documents.

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Strabo, Geography, Book 6, chapter 3 (search)
account of him; but there is also a second, that he stayed here till the end of his life; and a third, the aforesaid mythical account, which tells of his disappearance in the island; and as a fourth one might set down the account of the Heneti, for they too tell a mythical story of how he in some way came to his end in their country, and they call it his apotheosis. Now the above distances are put down in accordance with the data of Artemidorus;Artemidorus (flourished about 100 B.C.), of Ephesus, was an extensive traveller and a geographer of great importance. He wrote a geography of the inhabited world in eleven books, a Periplus of the Mediterranean, and Ionian Historical Sketches. But his works, except numerous fragments preserved in other authors, are now lost. but according to the Chorographer,See 5. 2. 7 and footnote. the distances from Brentesium as far as GarganumMonte Gargano. amount to one hundred and sixty-five miles, whereas according to Artemidorus they amount to mo