hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 30 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 16 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller) 14 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 14 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 12 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 12 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 12 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 10 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 10 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson). You can also browse the collection for Phrygia (Turkey) or search for Phrygia (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 1, chapter 2 (search)
his river was two plethra,The plethrum = about 97 English feet. and there was a bridge over it made of seven boats. After crossing the Maeander he marched through Phrygia one stage, a distance of eight parasangs, to Colossae, an inhabitedMany of the cities of Asia were then, as now, deserted. city, prosperous and large. There he rend five hundred peltasts, consisting of Dolopians, Aenianians, and Olynthians. Thence he marched three stages, twenty parasangs, to Celaenae, an inhabited city of Phrygia, large and prosperous. There Cyrus had a palace and a large park full of wild animals, which he used to hunt on horseback whenever he wished to give himself and hyrus was delighted to see the terror with which the Greeks inspired the barbarians. Thence he marched three stages, twenty parasangs, to Iconium, the last city of Phrygia. There he remained three days. Thence he marched through Lycaonia five stages, thirty parasangs. This country he gave over to the Greeks to plunder, on the ground
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 5, chapter 6 (search)
pay from the first of the month at the rate of a CyziceneA gold coin of Cyzicus, an important Greek city on the Propontis. It was equivalent in weight of gold to l lls. l d. or $7.56; but see note on Xen. Anab. 1.1.9. per month to each man; and I will take you to Troas, the place from which I am an exile, and my city will be at your service; for they will receive me willingly. Then I myself will lead you to places from which you will get an abundance of wealth. I am acquainted with Aeolis, Phrygia, Troas, and the entire province of Pharnabazus,Persian satrap of Lesser Phrygia and Bithynia. partly because I come from that region, and partly because I have campaigned there with Clearchus and Dercylidas.”A Spartan general. He had taken part in the Peloponnesian War, and was the commander under whom the Ten Thousand later served. Next rose Thorax the Boeotian, who was at odds with Xenophon over the generalship of the army, and said that once they got out of the Euxine they would have
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 6, chapter 4 (search)
would be their leader. There set out accordingly, with poles,i.e. for carrying the booty. wine-skins, bags, and other vessels, about two thousand men. But when they had reached the villages and were scattering here and there for the purpose of securing plunder, they were attacked first of all by the horsemen of Pharnabazus;See note on Xen. Anab. 5.6.24. for they had come to the aid of the Bithynians, desiring in company with the Bithynians to prevent the Greeks, if they could, from entering Phrygia; these horsemen killed no fewer than five hundred of the soldiers, the rest fleeing for refuge to the heights. After this one of the men who escaped brought back word to the camp of what had happened. And Xenophon, inasmuch as the sacrifices had not proved favourable on that day, took a bullock that was yoked to a wagon,—for there were no other sacrificial animals,—offered it up, and set out to the rescue, as did all the rest who were under thirty years of age, to the last man. And they pic
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 7, chapter 8 (search)
est; the result was, that he was now able even to do a kindness to another. Meanwhile Thibron arrived and took over the army, and uniting it with the rest of his Greek forces, proceeded to wage war upon Tissaphernes and Pharnabazus. The MSS. add the following statistical notes, which, like the summaries prefixed to the several books, must have been the contribution of a late editor.[The governors of all the King's territories that we traversed were as follows: Artimas of Lydia, Artacamas of Phrygia, Mithradates of Lycaonia and Cappadocia, Syennesis of Cilicia, Dernes of Phoenicia and Arabia, Belesys of Syria and Assyria, Rhoparas of Babylon, Arbacas of Media, Tiribazus of the Phasians and Hesperites; then the Carduchians, Chalybians, Chaldaeans, Macronians, Colchians, Mossynoecians, Coetians, and Tibarenians, who were independent; and then Corylas governor of Paphlagonia, Pharnabazus of the Bithynians, and Seuthes of the Thracians in Europe. The length of the entire journey, upward an