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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 30 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 16 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller) 14 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 14 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 12 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 12 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 12 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 10 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge). You can also browse the collection for Phrygia (Turkey) or search for Phrygia (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

M. Tullius Cicero, For Sextus Roscius of Ameria (ed. C. D. Yonge), chapter 32 (search)
even the heads of senators, to public view; so that Seneca says of the lake, “id enim proscriptionis Sullanae spoliorum est.” “Who was not wounded there with PhrygianThis is a fragment of a play of Ennius; by the words, “Phrygian steel” he points out that these murders were chiefly committed by slaves, great numbers of whom had lately been imported from Phrygia. Facciolati thinks too that allusion is made to the Oriental and luxurious manners of Sulla. steel?” I need not enumerate all,—the Curtii, the Marii, the Mamerci, whom age now exempted from battles; and, lastly, the aged Priam himself, Antistius, In the Brutus Cicero speaks of Antistius as a tolerable speaker; he calls him here Priam, meaning that he acted as a sort of leader and king among the
M. Tullius Cicero, Against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge), section 95 (search)
But how he as proquaestor harassed the republic of the Milyades, how he oppressed Lycia, Pamphylia, Piscidia, and all Phrygia, in his levying corn from them, and valuing it according to that valuation of his which he then devised for the first time, it is not necessary for me now to relate, know this much, that these articles (and all such matters were transacted through his instrumentality, while he levied on the cities corn, hides, hair-cloth, sacks, but did not receive the goods but exacted money instead of them),—for these articles alone damages were laid in the action against Dolabella, at three millions of sesterces. And all these things even if they were done with the consent of Dolabella, were yet all accomplished through the instrumentality of that man
M. Tullius Cicero, Against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge), section 154 (search)
Do we ask what he did in the distant province of Phrygia? what in the most remote parts of Pamphylia? What a robber of pirates he proved himself in war, who had been found to be a nefarious plunderer of the Roman people in the forum? Do we doubt what that man would do with respect to spoils taken from the enemy, who appropriated to himself so much plunder from the spoils of Lucius Metellus? This temple of Castor had been vowed by Postumius, the dictator at the battle of Lake Regillus. It was decorated with statues and other embellishments by Lucius Metellus surnamed Dalmaticus, out of the wealth he acquired by, and the spoils he brought back from, the war in Illyricum. who let out a contract for whitewashing four pillars at a greater price than Metellus paid for erecting the whole of them? Must we wait to hear what the wit
M. Tullius Cicero, Against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge), section 191 (search)
instead of corn. And so I suppose the cultivators begged of him, that, as they could not sell a modius of wheat for three sesterces, they may be allowed to pay three denarii instead of each modius. Or, since you do not dare to say this, will you take refuge in that assertion, that, being influenced by the difficulty of carriage, they preferred to give three denarii? Of what carriage? Wishing not to have to carry it from what place to what place? from Philomelium to Ephesus? I see what is the difference between the price of corn at different places; I see too how many days' journey it is; I see that it is for the advantage of the Philomelians rather to pay in Phrygia the price which corn bears in Ephesus, than to carry it to Ephesus, or to send both money and agents to Ephesus to buy corn.