hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 84 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller) 74 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 38 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 16 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 16 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 14 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 12 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 8 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 8 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin). You can also browse the collection for Babylon (Iraq) or search for Babylon (Iraq) in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Isocrates, Evagoras (ed. George Norlin), section 58 (search)
For he was manifestly more concerned about the war in Cyprus than about any other, and regarded Evagoras as a more powerful and formidable antagonist than Cyrus, who had disputed the throne with him.Cf. Xen. Anab. 1 for the famous expedition of Cyrus the Younger against his brother Artaxerxes II. See Isoc. 4.145. The most convincing proof of this statement is this: when the king heard of the preparations Cyrus was making he viewed him with such contempt that because of his indifference Cyrus almost stood at the doors of his palace before he was aware of him.The battle of Cunaxa (401 B.C.) in which Cyrus was slain. The distance from Babylon, according to Xenophon, was 360 stades (c. 45 miles). With regard to Evagoras, however, the king had stood in terror of him for so long a time that even while he was receiving benefits from him he had undertaken to make war upon him—a wrongful act, indeed, but his purpose was not altogether unre