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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 84 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller) 74 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 38 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 16 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 16 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 14 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 12 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 8 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 8 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller). You can also browse the collection for Babylon (Iraq) or search for Babylon (Iraq) in all documents.

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Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 2, chapter 1 (search)
, and a great host of slingers. As for the Greeks who dwell in Asia, however, no definite information is as yet received whether they are in the coalition or not. But the contingent from Phrygia on the Hellespont, under Gabaedus, has arrived at Cay+stru-Pedium, it is said, to the number of 6000 horse and 10,000 peltasts.The Carians, however, and Cilicians and Paphlagonians, they say, have not joined the expedition, although they have been invited to do so. But the Assyrians, both those from Babylon and those from the rest of Assyria, will bring, I think, not fewer than 20,000 horse and not fewer, I am sure, than 200 war-chariots, and a vast number of infantry, I suppose; at any rate, they used to have as many as that whenever they invaded our country.” “You mean to say,” said Cyrus, “that the enemy have 60,000 horse and more than 200,000 peltasts and bowmen. And at how many, pray, do you estimate the number of your own forces?”“There are,” said he, “of the Medes more than 10,
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 5, chapter 2 (search)
But one gift of yours will I take as I leave you, in place of which not even all the wealth of Babylon (and that is enormous)—no, not even all the wealth of all the world would send me away more hap.“Because, to effect a union of forces with him, one has to march along under the very walls of Babylon.” “Why, pray,” said the other, “is that so difficult?”“Because, by Zeus,” said Gobryas, “I knowfrom him. “But when I think of it, I cannot conceive of anyCyrus proposes to march straight for Babylon safer procedure for us than to march directly upon Babylon, if that is where the main body of tBabylon, if that is where the main body of the enemy's forces is. For they are, as you say, numerous; and if they take courage, they will also, as I say, give us cause to fear them. However, if they do not see us and get the idea that we are kd, let me assure you, we could in no possible way strike more terror into them when they do see us, than by marching upon them. As this, therefore, is my conviction, lead us straight on to
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 5, chapter 3 (search)
i what belongs to the gods, set apart for the army its share, and then call Gobryas in and give the rest to him.”So they set aside what was required and gave the rest to Gobryas. After this Cyrus renewed his march uponThe Assyrian refuses battle Babylon, with his army in the same order as when the battle was fought. But as the Assyrians did not march out to meet them, Cyrus ordered Gobryas to ride up and say: “If the king wishes to come out and fight for his country, I myself would join him andf sleep on account of doing sentinel duty may not be serious and exhaust the men for the march. And when the hour for starting comes, let the signal be given on the horn. And then do you all, with whatever is necessary, step out into the road to Babylon; and let each commander, as he gets his division in motion, pass the word to the man behind him to come on.” Hereupon they went to their tents, and, asCyrus's memory for names they went, they remarked to one another what a good memory Cyrus had <
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 5, chapter 4 (search)
ff, without consulting Cyrus or saying anything to him, to make a foray into the country toward Babylon. And as the Cadusian cavalry were scattered, the Assyrian, returning from his city in which he cted that those who had gone over to him would suffer severely, as they were in the vicinity of Babylon, if he were not always at hand, he ordered those of the enemy whom he released to tell the Assy father's estate seemed to me the finest in the world; for it was so near to the mighty city of Babylon that we enjoyed all the advantages of a great city but could come back home and be rid of all iamp where things were most abundant. And when, as he proceeded, he came in sight of the city of Babylon and it seemed to him that the road which he was following led close by the walls, he called Gobim extremely ill-prepared.” “You seem to be surprised, Gobryas,” saidCyrus's tactics in passing Babylon Cyrus in answer, “that I marched right up to the walls when I came with a much smaller army, w
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 6, chapter 1 (search)
t they might become inured to labour through these expeditions and might thus be in better health and strength, and partly that by such marches they might be enabled to keep their respective positions in mind. Thus, then, Cyrus was occupied.From Babylon a report was now brought byThe king leaves Babylon deserters and confirmed by his prisoners of war, that the Assyrian king had gone off in the direction of Lydia with many talents of gold and silver and with other treasures and jewels of every sBabylon deserters and confirmed by his prisoners of war, that the Assyrian king had gone off in the direction of Lydia with many talents of gold and silver and with other treasures and jewels of every sort. So it became general talk among the rank and file of the soldiers that he was already conveying his treasures to a place of safety because he was afraid. But Cyrus, recognizing that he had gone for the purpose of forming, if he could, a coalition against him, made vigorous counter preparation in the expectation that he would have to fight again. And so he setCyrus increases his cavalry about bringing to its full complement the Persian cavalry, for which he obtained horses, some requisition
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 6, chapter 2 (search)
lready been hired and that Egyptians were under sail to join them, and they gave the number as one hundred and twenty thousand men armed with shields that came to their feet, with huge spears, such as they carry even to this day, and with sabres. Besides these, there was also the Cyprian army. The Cilicians were all present already, they said, as were also the contingents from both Phrygias, Lycaonia, Paphlagonia, Cappadocia, Arabia, and Phoenicia; the Assyrians were there under the king of Babylon; the Ionians also and the Aeolians and almost all the Greek colonists in Asia had been compelled to join Croesus, and Croesus had even sent to Lacedaemon to negotiate an alliance. This army, they said, was being mustered at the River Pactolus, but it was their intention to advance to Thymbrara, where even to-day is the rendezvous of the king's barbarians from the interior. And a general call had been issued to bring provisions to market there.The prisoners also told practically the same sto
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 7, chapter 2 (search)
should bear this title and I address you by it.” “And I you, Croesus; for we are both men. But, Croesus,” he added, “would you be willing to give me a bit of advice?”“Aye, Cyrus,” said he; “I wish I could find something of practical value to say to you. For that, I think, would prove good for me as well.” “Listen, then, Croesus,” said he. “I observe that my soldiers have gone through many toils and dangers and now are thinking that they are in possession of the richest city in Asia, next to Babylon; and I think that they deserve some reward. For I know that if they do not reap some fruit of their labours, I shall not be able to keep them in obedience very long. Now, I do not wish to abandon the cityCyrus proposes to spare Sardis to them to plunder; for I believe that then the city would be destroyed, and I am sure that in the pillaging the worst men would get the largest share.” “Well,” said Croesus on hearing these words, “permit me to say to any Lydians that
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 7, chapter 4 (search)
the slingers in the world could stand against a very few men who came into a hand-to-hand encounter with them with weapons suited for close combat. On the way to Babylon he subdued GreaterHe marches still conquering to Babylon Phrygia and Cappadocia and reduced the Arabians to submission. From all these he secured armour for not lBabylon Phrygia and Cappadocia and reduced the Arabians to submission. From all these he secured armour for not less than forty thousand Persian horsemen, and many horses taken from the prisoners he distributed among all the divisions of his allies. And thus he arrived before Babylon with a great host of cavalry, and a great host of bowmen and spearmen, and a multitude of slingers that was beyond number. all these he secured armour for not less than forty thousand Persian horsemen, and many horses taken from the prisoners he distributed among all the divisions of his allies. And thus he arrived before Babylon with a great host of cavalry, and a great host of bowmen and spearmen, and a multitude of slingers that was beyond number.
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 7, chapter 5 (search)
When Cyrus appeared before Babylon heCyrus surrounds Babylon stationed his whole force about the ciBabylon stationed his whole force about the city and then rode around it himself in company with his friends and the staff-officers of the alliesmpassing walls of such extent,See Index, s.v. Babylon, note. the lines necessarily had but little dard that a certain festival had come round in Babylon, during which all Babylon was accustomed to dBabylon was accustomed to drink and revel all night long, Cyrus took a large number of men, just as soon as it was dark, and o” When these words were spoken, they advanced.Babylon falls And of those they met on the way, some rdis and Croesus in subjection; we have taken Babylon and subjugated everything; and yet yesterday,side of him. And since he considered that all Babylon, too,The city guards stood in need of adequat established about himself and in the city of Babylon is maintained on the same footing even to thiell you, my men; butThe Persian discipline in Babylon Xen. Cyrop. 1.2.4 ff. just as in Persia the p
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 8, chapter 5 (search)
When it seemed to him that affairs in BabylonCyrus goes to Persia were sufficiently well organized for him to absent himself from the city, he began to make preparations for his journey to Persia and issued instructions to the others accordingly. And as soon as he had got together in sufficient quantity, as he believed, everything a, Cyrus turned aside to visit Cyaxares. And when they had exchanged greetings, the first thing Cyrus told Cyaxares was that a palace had been selected for him in Babylon, and official headquarters, so that he might occupy a residence of his own whenever he came there; and then he also gave him many splendid presents. Cyaxares accehe daughter of Cyaxares, for he had obtained the consent of his father and mother. And to this day people still tell of her wonderful beauty. And when he was married he at once departed with his bride for Babylon.
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