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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 158 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 66 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 40 0 Browse Search
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Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 20 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 16 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin). You can also browse the collection for Hellespont (Turkey) or search for Hellespont (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 8 document sections:

Isocrates, Panegyricus (ed. George Norlin), section 89 (search)
subjugate Hellas, and proposing to leave a memorial such as would mark a more than human power, did not stop until he had devised and compelled the execution of a plan whose fame is on the lips of all mankind—a plan by which, having bridged the Hellespont and channelled Athos, he sailed his ships across the mainland, and marched his troops across the main?A like artificiality of rhetoric to describe the presumption of Xerxes in building a bridge across the Hellespont for his troops and a canal t compelled the execution of a plan whose fame is on the lips of all mankind—a plan by which, having bridged the Hellespont and channelled Athos, he sailed his ships across the mainland, and marched his troops across the main?A like artificiality of rhetoric to describe the presumption of Xerxes in building a bridge across the Hellespont for his troops and a canal through the promontory of Athos for his ships (Hdt. 7.22-24) seems to have been conventional. Cf. Lys. 2.29 and Aesch. Pers.
Isocrates, Panegyricus (ed. George Norlin), section 119 (search)
And that this state of affairs was due to the valor of our ancestors has been clearly shown in the fortunes of our city: for the very moment when we were deprived of our dominion marked the beginning of a dominionFor this play of words— a)rxh/, “beginning,” and arxh/, “dominion”—cf. Isoc. 3.28, Isoc. 8.101, Isoc. 5.61. of ills for the Hellenes. In fact, after the disaster which befell us in the Hellespont,Battle of Aegospotami 405 B.C. when our rivals took our place as leaders, the barbarians won a naval victory,At the battle of Cnidus, but with the help of Conon. became rulers of the sea, occupied most of the islands,See Xen. Hell. 4.8.7. made a landing in Laconia, took Cythera by storm, and sailed around the whole Peloponnesus, inflicting damage as
Isocrates, To Philip (ed. George Norlin), section 62 (search)
The career of Conon,See Isoc. 4.142 ff. not many years later, is a counterpart to that of Alcibiades. After his defeat in the naval engagement in the Hellespont,The battle of Aegospotami. for which not he but his fellow commanders were responsible, he was too chagrined to return home; instead he sailed to Cyprus, where he spent some time attending to his private interests.See Isoc. 9.52 ff. But learning that Agesilaus had crossed over into Asia with a large forceSee 86, 87, and Isoc. Letter 9.13-14. and was ravaging the country, he was so dauntless of spirit
Isocrates, Areopagiticus (ed. George Norlin), section 64 (search)
When we lost our fleet in the HellespontAt the Battle of Arginusae, 406 B. C., the beginning of the end of the Peloponnesian War. and our city was plunged into the disasters of that time, who of our older men does not know that the “people's party,”Many of them had been exiled by the Thirty or had fled for their lives. Thrasybulus placed himself at their head, defeated the Thirty in battle, and restored the democracy. See Xen. Hell. 2.4.10 ff. as they were called, were ready to go to any length of hardship to avoid doing what the enemy commanded, deeming it monstrous that anyone should see the city which had ruled over the Hellenes in subjection to another state, whereas the partisans of oligarchy were ready both to tear down the wallsOne of the terms insisted on by Lysander was that the “long walls” connecting Athens with the Piraeus be demolished. and to submit to s
Isocrates, On the Peace (ed. George Norlin), section 86 (search)
plites (unless a hopeless exaggeration) cannot be accounted for if the reading of *g*e or that of the other MSS. is adopted. See Laistner in Classical Quarterly xv. p. 81. At the beginning of the Peloponnesian War (according to Thuc. 2.13), the Athenian heavy-armed troops numbered but 29,000. Later (according to Dem. 25.51), the whole body of Athenian citizens numbered but 20,000. they lost ten thousand heavy armed troops of their own and of their allies, and in Sicily forty thousand men and two hundred and forty ships,Diodorus (Dio. Sic. 13.21) gives the same number of men, but 200 ships. Thucydides gives the number of ships as 209 and the number of men as not less than 40,000, including heavy and light armed troops, crews, etc. See especially Thuc. 7.75.5. and, finally, in the Hellespont two hundred ships.At the battle of Aegospotami in 405 B.C., the denouement of this tragic history. Xenophon (Xen. Hell. 2.1.20) and Diodorus (Dio. Sic. 13.105) give 180
Isocrates, Panathenaicus (ed. George Norlin), section 44 (search)
And after this, they founded many great cities on both continents,Europe and Asia—north and south of the Hellespont. swept the barbarians back from the sea, and taught the Hellenes in what way they should manage their own countries and against whom they should wage war in order to make Hellas great
Isocrates, Panathenaicus (ed. George Norlin), section 99 (search)
And as to the stirring up of faction and slaughter and revolution in these cities, which certain critics impute both to Athens and to Sparta, you will find that the Lacedaemonians have filled all the states, excepting a very few, with these misfortunes and afflictions,See Isoc. 4.114. whereas no one would dare even to allege that our city, before the disaster which befell her in the Hellespont,At Aegospotami, 405 b.c. See Isoc. 4.119. ever perpetrated such a thing among her allies.
Isocrates, Antidosis (ed. George Norlin), section 108 (search)
For who does not know that Corcyra has the best strategic position among the cities in the neighborhood of the Peloponnese; Samos, among the cities of Ionia; Sestos and Crithôte, among those in the Hellespont; and Potidaea and Torône among the settlements in Thrace?All these cities he has taken and presented to you, with no great outlay of money, without imposing burdens upon your present allies, and without forcing you to pay many taxesSpecial taxes levied for military purposes. into the treasury